Experiences and acceptance of intimate partner violence: associations with sexually transmitted infection symptoms and ability to negotiate sexual safety among young Liberian women

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Experiences and acceptance of intimate partner violence: associations with sexually transmitted infection symptoms and ability to negotiate sexual safety among young Liberian women

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Experiences and acceptance of intimate partner violence: associations with sexually transmitted infection symptoms and ability to negotiate sexual safety among young Liberian women
Author: Callands, Tamora A.; Sipsma, Heather L.; Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Hansen, Nathan B.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Callands, Tamora A., Heather L. Sipsma, Theresa S. Betancourt, and Nathan B. Hansen. 2013. “Experiences and Acceptance of Intimate Partner Violence: Associations with Sexually Transmitted Infection Symptoms and Ability to Negotiate Sexual Safety Among Young Liberian Women.” Culture, Health & Sexuality 15 (6) (June): 680–694. doi:10.1080/13691058.2013.779030.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Women who experience intimate partner violence may be at elevated risk for poor sexual health outcomes including sexual transmitted infections (STIs). This association however, has not been consistently demonstrated in low-income or post-conflict countries; furthermore, the role that attitudes towards intimate partner violence play in sexual health outcomes and behaviour has rarely been examined. We examined associations between intimate partner violence experiences, accepting attitudes towards physical intimate partner violence, and sexual health and behavioural outcomes among 592 young women in post-conflict Liberia. Participants’ experiences with either moderate or severe physical violence or sexual violence were common. Additionally, accepting attitudes towards physical intimate partner violence were positively associated with reporting STI symptoms, intimate partner violence experiences and the ability to negotiate safe sex. Findings suggest that for sexual health promotion and risk reduction intervention efforts to achieve full impact, interventions must address the contextual influence of violence, including individual attitudes toward intimate partner violence.
Published Version: doi:10.1080/13691058.2013.779030
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3686894/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:26482162
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters