Nutritional Status and Other Baseline Predictors of Mortality among HIV-Infected Children Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Tanzania

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Nutritional Status and Other Baseline Predictors of Mortality among HIV-Infected Children Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Tanzania

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Title: Nutritional Status and Other Baseline Predictors of Mortality among HIV-Infected Children Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Tanzania
Author: Mwiru, R. S.; Spiegelman, Donna Lynn; Duggan, Christopher Paul; Seage, George R.; Semu, H.; Chalamilla, G; Kisenge, R.; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

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Citation: Mwiru, R. S., D. Spiegelman, C. Duggan, G. R. Seage, H. Semu, G. Chalamilla, R. Kisenge, and W. W. Fawzi. 2013. “Nutritional Status and Other Baseline Predictors of Mortality Among HIV-Infected Children Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Tanzania.” Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (JIAPAC) 14 (2) (October 8): 172–179. doi:10.1177/2325957413500852.
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Abstract: BACKGROUND:
We assembled a prospective cohort of 3144 children less than 15 years of age initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
METHODS:
The relationships of nutritional status and other baseline characteristics in relation to mortality were examined using Cox proportional hazards model.
RESULTS:
Compared with children with weight for age (WAZ) > -1, those with WAZ ≤ -2 to < -3 had a nearly double risk of death (relative risk [RR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-3.11), and among those with WAZ ≤ -3, the risk more than tripled (RR, 3.36; 95% CI, 2.12-5.32). Other baseline risk factors for overall mortality included severe anemia (P < .001), severe immune suppression (P = .02), history of tuberculosis (P = .01), opportunistic infections (P < .001), living in the poorest district (P < .001), and advanced World Health Organization stage (P = .003).
CONCLUSIONS:
To sustain the obtained benefit of ART in this setting, interventions to improve nutritional status may be used as an adjunct to ART.
Published Version: doi:10.1177/2325957413500852
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4627587/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:26836020
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