Characterization of an in vitro fed-batch model to obtain cells released from S. epidermidis biofilms

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Characterization of an in vitro fed-batch model to obtain cells released from S. epidermidis biofilms

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Title: Characterization of an in vitro fed-batch model to obtain cells released from S. epidermidis biofilms
Author: França, Angela; Carvalhais, Virgínia; Vilanova, Manuel; Pier, Gerald B.; Cerca, Nuno

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Citation: França, Angela, Virgínia Carvalhais, Manuel Vilanova, Gerald B. Pier, and Nuno Cerca. 2016. “Characterization of an in vitro fed-batch model to obtain cells released from S. epidermidis biofilms.” AMB Express 6 (1): 23. doi:10.1186/s13568-016-0197-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13568-016-0197-9.
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Abstract: Both dynamic and fed-batch systems have been used for the study of biofilms. Dynamic systems, whose hallmark is the presence of continuous flow, have been considered the most appropriate for the study of the last stage of the biofilm lifecycle: biofilm disassembly. However, fed-batch is still the most used system in the biofilm research field. Hence, we have used a fed-batch system to collect cells released from Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, one of the most important etiological agents of medical device-associated biofilm infections. Herein, we showed that using this model it was possible to collect cells released from biofilms formed by 12 different S. epidermidis clinical and commensal isolates. In addition, our data indicated that biofilm disassembly occurred by both passive and active mechanisms, although the last occurred to a lesser extent. Moreover, it was observed that S. epidermidis biofilm-released cells presented higher tolerance to vancomycin and tetracycline, as well as a particular gene expression phenotype when compared with either biofilm or planktonic cells. Using this model, biofilm-released cells phenotype and their interaction with the host immune system could be studied in more detail, which could help providing significant insights into the pathophysiology of biofilm-related infections.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s13568-016-0197-9
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4801823/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:26859943
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