High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity

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High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity

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Title: High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity
Author: Romanska, Aleksandra; Rezlescu, Constantin; Susilo, Tirta; Duchaine, Bradley; Banissy, Michael J.

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Citation: Romanska, Aleksandra, Constantin Rezlescu, Tirta Susilo, Bradley Duchaine, and Michael J. Banissy. 2015. “High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity.” Cerebral Cortex (New York, NY) 25 (11): 4334-4340. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhv016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhv016.
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Abstract: Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of transcranial current stimulation as a tool to facilitate a variety of cognitive and perceptual abilities. Few studies, though, have examined the utility of this approach for the processing of social information. Here, we conducted 2 experiments to explore whether a single session of high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices would enhance facial identity perception. In Experiment 1, participants received 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS or sham stimulation prior to completing the tasks examining facial identity perception or trustworthiness perception. Active high-frequency tRNS facilitated facial identity perception, but not trustworthiness perception. Experiment 2 assessed the spatial specificity of this effect by delivering 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices or sensorimotor cortices prior to participants completing the same facial identity perception task used in Experiment 1. High-frequency tRNS targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices enhanced performance relative to motor cortex stimulation. These findings show that high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices produces task-specific and site-specific enhancements in face perception.
Published Version: doi:10.1093/cercor/bhv016
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4816786/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:26860220
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