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dc.contributor.authorde-Torres, Juan P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarín, Jose M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPinto-Plata, Víctoren_US
dc.contributor.authorDivo, Miguelen_US
dc.contributor.authorSanchez-Salcedo, Pabloen_US
dc.contributor.authorZagaceta, Jorgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorZulueta, Javier J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBerto, Juanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCabrera, Carlosen_US
dc.contributor.authorCelli, Bartolome R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCasanova, Ciroen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-02T17:02:19Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.citationde-Torres, J. P., J. M. Marín, V. Pinto-Plata, M. Divo, P. Sanchez-Salcedo, J. Zagaceta, J. J. Zulueta, et al. 2016. “Is COPD a Progressive Disease? A Long Term Bode Cohort Observation.” PLoS ONE 11 (4): e0151856. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0151856. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0151856.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:26860322
dc.description.abstractBackground: The Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Diseases (GOLD) defines COPD as a disease that is usually progressive. GOLD also provides a spirometric classification of airflow limitation. However, little is known about the long-term changes of patients in different GOLD grades. Objective: Explore the proportion and characteristics of COPD patients that change their spirometric GOLD grade over long-term follow-up. Methods: Patients alive for at least 8 years since recruitment and those who died with at least 4 years of repeated spirometric measurements were selected from the BODE cohort database. We purposely included the group of non survivors to avoid a “survival selection” bias. The proportion of patients that had a change (improvement or worsening) in their spirometric GOLD grading was calculated and their characteristics compared with those that remained in the same grade. Results: A total of 318 patients were included in the survivor and 217 in the non-survivor groups. Nine percent of survivors and 11% of non survivors had an improvement of at least one GOLD grade. Seventy one percent of survivors and non-survivors remained in the same GOLD grade. Those that improved had a greater degree of airway obstruction at baseline. Conclusions: In this selected population of COPD patients, a high proportion of patients remained in the same spirometric GOLD grade or improved in a long-term follow-up. These findings suggest that once diagnosed, COPD is usually a non-progressive disease.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0151856en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4839642/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectPulmonologyen
dc.subjectChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseaseen
dc.subjectBiology and Life Sciencesen
dc.subjectPhysiologyen
dc.subjectPhysiological Propertiesen
dc.subjectPhysiological Parametersen
dc.subjectBody Weighten
dc.subjectBody Mass Indexen
dc.subjectBioassays and Physiological Analysisen
dc.subjectRespiratory Analysisen
dc.subjectSpirometryen
dc.subjectPharmacologyen
dc.subjectClinical Pharmacologyen
dc.subjectPathology and Laboratory Medicineen
dc.subjectProgressive Diseasesen
dc.subjectCardiovascular Medicineen
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseasesen
dc.subjectDatabase and Informatics Methodsen
dc.titleIs COPD a Progressive Disease? A Long Term Bode Cohort Observationen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorDivo, Miguelen_US
dc.date.available2016-05-02T17:02:19Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0151856*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedDivo, Miguel
dash.contributor.affiliatedCelli, Bartolome


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