Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSong, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.authorKatz, Jeffrey N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Laurence D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Joelen_US
dc.contributor.authorGomoll, Andreasen_US
dc.contributor.authorJain, Nitin B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-02T17:02:20Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.citationSong, Amos, Jeffrey N. Katz, Laurence D. Higgins, Joel Newman, Andreas Gomoll, and Nitin B. Jain. 2016. “Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis.” British journal of medicine and medical research 5 (5): 570-578. doi:10.9734/BJMMR/2015/13478. http://dx.doi.org/10.9734/BJMMR/2015/13478.en
dc.identifier.issn2231-0614en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:26860323
dc.description.abstractAims To assess short and longer-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis. Study Design A mixed prospective and retrospective study design Place and Duration of Study Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, between June 2011 and July 2012. Methodology Using medical records, we first retrospectively identified patients who had received ultrasound-guided injections of lidocaine and triamcinolone for adhesive capsulitis We then assessed short-term follow-up outcomes (within 3 months of procedure) using medical record review and phone interviews. Longer-term follow-up (at least 3 months from the procedure) outcomes were determined by mailings and phone calls. Average and worst shoulder pain scores were measured on a visual analog scale. Shoulder ROM was measured in forward flexion, isolated abduction, and external rotation. Results: Patients presented an average of 5.1 (SD=4.1) months after onset of symptoms. Within three months of the injection, 55.9% (95% CI: 39.2%, 72.6%) of patients reported greater than 75% pain relief and 44.1% (95% CI: 27.4%, 60.8%) of patients reported greater than 75% ROM improvement. The percentage of patients who improved increased with increased duration of follow-up. At short-term follow-up (mean=2.1 months, SD=2.7), average pain decreased from 5.6 (SD=2.2) to 3.0 (SD=1.8) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased from 7.8 (SD=1.2) to 4.3 (SD=3.2) (p ≤ .001). At longer-term follow-up (mean =10.4 months, SD=3.7), average pain decreased to 1.9 (SD=1.9) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased to 2.9 (SD=2.3) (p ≤ .001). Conclusion: A majority of patients had significant pain reduction and functional improvement after an ultrasound guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injection for adhesive capsulitis. Our patients experience the majority of their pain and functional relief within the first three months after an ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection with continued increase in relief in the longer-term.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.9734/BJMMR/2015/13478en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4824683/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectUltrasounden
dc.subjectcorticosteroidsen
dc.subjectadhesive capsulitisen
dc.subjectinjectionsen
dc.titleOutcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitisen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalBritish journal of medicine and medical researchen
dash.depositing.authorKatz, Jeffrey N.en_US
dc.date.available2016-05-02T17:02:20Z
dc.identifier.doi10.9734/BJMMR/2015/13478*
dash.contributor.affiliatedHiggins, Laurence D
dash.contributor.affiliatedGomoll, Andreas H.
dash.contributor.affiliatedKatz, Jeffrey


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record