Maternal Vitamin D Status and Child Morbidity, Anemia, and Growth in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-exposed Children in Tanzania

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Maternal Vitamin D Status and Child Morbidity, Anemia, and Growth in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-exposed Children in Tanzania

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Title: Maternal Vitamin D Status and Child Morbidity, Anemia, and Growth in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-exposed Children in Tanzania
Author: Finkelstein, Julia; Mehta, Saurabh; Duggan, Christopher Paul; Manji, Karim P.; Mugusi, Ferdinand M.; Aboud, Said; Spiegelman, Donna Lynn; Msamanga, Gernard I.; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Finkelstein, Julia L., Saurabh Mehta, Christopher Duggan, Karim P. Manji, Ferdinand M. Mugusi, Said Aboud, Donna Spiegelman, Gernard I. Msamanga, and Wafaie W. Fawzi. 2012. “Maternal Vitamin D Status and Child Morbidity, Anemia, and Growth in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Exposed Children in Tanzania.” The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 31 (2) (February): 171–175. doi:10.1097/inf.0b013e318245636b.
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Abstract: Background

Vitamin D may help prevent adverse pediatric outcomes, including infectious diseases and growth failure, based on its role in immune and metabolic functions. We examined the association of maternal vitamin D status and pediatric health outcomes in children born to HIV-infected women.

Methods

Vitamin D status was determined in 884 HIV-infected pregnant women at 12 to 27 weeks of gestation in a trial of vitamin supplementation (not including vitamin D) in Tanzania. Information on child morbidities, anemia and hypochromic microcytosis, and anthropometry was recorded through monthly clinic visits. Generalized estimated equations and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the relationships of outcomes with maternal vitamin D status.

Results

A total of 39% of women had low vitamin D levels (<32 ng/mL). Children born to women with low vitamin D status were 1.11 times more likely to report cough during follow-up (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.02-1.21). No significant associations were noted for other respiratory symptoms, diarrhea, or anemia outcomes. Low maternal vitamin D status was associated with significantly increased risk of stunting (height-for-age z-score <-2; RR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.05-1.59) and underweight (weight-for-age z-score <-2; RR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.03-1.71).

Conclusions

Maternal vitamin D status may be an important risk factor for respiratory infections, and ensuring optimal growth in HIV-exposed children.
Published Version: doi:10.1097/INF.0b013e318245636b
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3813463/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:26978416
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