Chromatin-Associated Proteins HP1 and Mod(mdg4) Modify Y-Linked Regulatory Variation in the Drosophila Testis

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Chromatin-Associated Proteins HP1 and Mod(mdg4) Modify Y-Linked Regulatory Variation in the Drosophila Testis

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Title: Chromatin-Associated Proteins HP1 and Mod(mdg4) Modify Y-Linked Regulatory Variation in the Drosophila Testis
Author: Branco, Alan; Hartl, Daniel L.; Silva, Bernardo Lemos

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Citation: Branco, A. T., D. L. Hartl, and B. Lemos. 2013. “Chromatin-Associated Proteins HP1 and Mod(mdg4) Modify Y-Linked Regulatory Variation in the Drosophila Testis.” Genetics 194 (3) (July 1): 609–618.
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Abstract: Chromatin remodeling is crucial for gene regulation. Remodeling is often mediated through chemical modifications of the DNA template, DNA-associated proteins, and RNA-mediated processes. Y-linked regulatory variation (YRV) refers to the quantitative effects that polymorphic tracts of Y-linked chromatin exert on gene expression of X-linked and autosomal genes. Here we show that naturally occurring polymorphisms in the Drosophila melanogaster Y chromosome contribute disproportionally to gene expression variation in the testis. The variation is dependent on wild-type expression levels of mod(mdg4) as well as Su(var)205; the latter gene codes for heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) in Drosophila. Testis-specific YRV is abolished in genotypes with heterozygous loss-of-function mutations for mod(mdg4) and Su(var)205 but not in similar experiments with JIL-1. Furthermore, the Y chromosome differentially regulates several ubiquitously expressed genes. The results highlight the requirement for wild-type dosage of Su(var)205 and mod(mdg4) in enabling naturally occurring Y-linked regulatory variation in the testis. The phenotypes that emerge in the context of wild-type levels of the HP1 and Mod(mdg4) proteins might be part of an adaptive response to the environment.
Published Version: doi:10.1534/genetics.113.150805
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27024104
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