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dc.contributor.authorSommers, Benjamin Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-13T15:33:29Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationSommers, Benjamin D. 2016. State Medicaid Expansions and Mortality, Revisited: A Cost-Benefit Analysis. American Journal of Health Economics. Forthcoming.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2332-3493en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27305958
dc.description.abstractPrevious research found that Medicaid expansions in New York, Arizona, and Maine in the early 2000’s reduced mortality. I revisit this question with improved data and methods, exploring distinct causes of death and presenting a cost-benefit analysis. Differences-in-differences analysis using a propensity-score control group shows that all-cause mortality declined by 6%, with the most robust reductions for healthcare-amenable causes. HIV-related mortality (affected by the recent introduction of antiretrovirals) accounted for 20% of the effect. Mortality changes were closely linked to county-level coverage gains, with one life saved annually for every 239-316 adults gaining insurance. The results imply a cost-per-life saved ranging from $327,000 to $867,000, which compares favorably to most estimates of the value of a statistical life.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMIT Pressen_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.subjectMedicaiden_US
dc.subjecthealth insuranceen_US
dc.subjectmortalityen_US
dc.titleState Medicaid Expansions and Mortality, Revisited: A Cost-Benefit Analysisen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalAmerican Journal of Health Economicsen_US
dash.depositing.authorSommers, Benjamin Daniel
dc.date.available2016-06-13T15:33:29Z
workflow.legacycommentsFLAG9 Forthcomingen_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedSommers, Ben


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