Polyethylene Glycol-Based Synthetic Hydrogel Sealant for Closing Vitrectomy Wounds: An In Vivo and Histological Study

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Polyethylene Glycol-Based Synthetic Hydrogel Sealant for Closing Vitrectomy Wounds: An In Vivo and Histological Study

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Title: Polyethylene Glycol-Based Synthetic Hydrogel Sealant for Closing Vitrectomy Wounds: An In Vivo and Histological Study
Author: Hoshi, Sujin; Okamoto, Fumiki; Arai, Mikki; Hirose, Tatsuo; Fukuda, Shinichi; Sugiura, Yoshimi; Oshika, Tetsuro

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Citation: Hoshi, Sujin, Fumiki Okamoto, Mikki Arai, Tatsuo Hirose, Shinichi Fukuda, Yoshimi Sugiura, and Tetsuro Oshika. 2016. “Polyethylene Glycol-Based Synthetic Hydrogel Sealant for Closing Vitrectomy Wounds: An In Vivo and Histological Study.” Translational Vision Science & Technology 5 (3): 7. doi:10.1167/tvst.5.3.7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/tvst.5.3.7.
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Abstract: Purpose We conducted an in vivo study using Dutch pigmented rabbit eyes to test the usefulness of polyethylene glycol (PEG) sealant for the closure of sutureless sclerotomies in microincisional vitrectomy surgery (MIVS). Methods: Three-port, 23-gauge vitrectomy was performed on rabbit eyes. After air leakage was confirmed by the application of 0.625% povidone–iodine at the sclerotomy site, PEG sealant was subconjunctivally injected using a 27-gauge needle through conjunctival incisions to cover the sclerotomy wounds, following which it was polymerized by the application of xenon light for 60 seconds. Ophthalmological examinations and intraocular pressure measurements were conducted the day before and 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after surgery. The eyes were enucleated for histological evaluation 7 days after surgery. Results: PEG sealant was rapidly polymerized by the application of xenon light after subconjunctival injection, and it firmly sealed the sclerotomies without air leakage, as confirmed by povidone–iodine dropping, in all cases. Conjunctival and scleral wounds closed with PEG sealant were successfully attached and remained intact till the end of the follow-up period. There was no sign of postoperative hypotony or infection in any eye, and no adverse effects of PEG sealant were found. In histological examination, linear scar formation and eosinophilic staining of collagen fibers were observed at the sclerotomy sites, while the sclerotomy tunnels appeared tightly closed. Conclusions: PEG sealant can be useful for the closure of sutureless 23-gauge vitrectomy incisions in rabbits. Translational Relevance The PEG sealant may become an effective option for closing vitrectomy incisions including pediatric cases.
Published Version: doi:10.1167/tvst.5.3.7
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4874449/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27320193
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