Signal Fluctuation Sensitivity: An Improved Metric for Optimizing Detection of Resting-State fMRI Networks

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Signal Fluctuation Sensitivity: An Improved Metric for Optimizing Detection of Resting-State fMRI Networks

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Title: Signal Fluctuation Sensitivity: An Improved Metric for Optimizing Detection of Resting-State fMRI Networks
Author: DeDora, Daniel J.; Nedic, Sanja; Katti, Pratha; Arnab, Shafique; Wald, Lawrence L.; Takahashi, Atsushi; Van Dijk, Koene R. A.; Strey, Helmut H.; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R.

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Citation: DeDora, Daniel J., Sanja Nedic, Pratha Katti, Shafique Arnab, Lawrence L. Wald, Atsushi Takahashi, Koene R. A. Van Dijk, Helmut H. Strey, and Lilianne R. Mujica-Parodi. 2016. “Signal Fluctuation Sensitivity: An Improved Metric for Optimizing Detection of Resting-State fMRI Networks.” Frontiers in Neuroscience 10 (1): 180. doi:10.3389/fnins.2016.00180. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2016.00180.
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Abstract: Task-free connectivity analyses have emerged as a powerful tool in functional neuroimaging. Because the cross-correlations that underlie connectivity measures are sensitive to distortion of time-series, here we used a novel dynamic phantom to provide a ground truth for dynamic fidelity between blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD)-like inputs and fMRI outputs. We found that the de facto quality-metric for task-free fMRI, temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR), correlated inversely with dynamic fidelity; thus, studies optimized for tSNR actually produced time-series that showed the greatest distortion of signal dynamics. Instead, the phantom showed that dynamic fidelity is reasonably approximated by a measure that, unlike tSNR, dissociates signal dynamics from scanner artifact. We then tested this measure, signal fluctuation sensitivity (SFS), against human resting-state data. As predicted by the phantom, SFS—and not tSNR—is associated with enhanced sensitivity to both local and long-range connectivity within the brain's default mode network.
Published Version: doi:10.3389/fnins.2016.00180
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4854902/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27320380
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