Consumers report lower confidence in their genetics knowledge following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing

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Consumers report lower confidence in their genetics knowledge following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing

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Title: Consumers report lower confidence in their genetics knowledge following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing
Author: Carere, Deanna Alexis; Kraft, Peter; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Roberts, J. Scott; Green, Robert C.

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Citation: Carere, Deanna Alexis, Peter Kraft, Kimberly A. Kaphingst, J. Scott Roberts, and Robert C. Green. 2015. “Consumers report lower confidence in their genetics knowledge following direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing.” Genetics in medicine : official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 18 (1): 65-72. doi:10.1038/gim.2015.34. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2015.34.
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Abstract: Purpose To measure changes to genetics knowledge and self-efficacy following personal genomic testing (PGT). Methods: New customers of 23andMe and Pathway Genomics completed a series of online surveys. Prior to receipt of results, and 6 months post-results, we measured genetics knowledge (9 true/false items) and genetics self-efficacy (5 Likert-scale items) and used paired methods to evaluate change over time. Correlates of change (e.g., decision regret) were identified using linear regression. Results: 998 PGT customers (59.9% female; 85.8% White; mean age 46.9±15.5 years) were included in our analyses. Mean genetics knowledge score out of 9 was 8.15±0.95 at baseline and 8.25±0.92 at 6 months (p = .0024). Mean self-efficacy score out of 35 was 29.06±5.59 at baseline and 27.7±5.46 at 6 months (p < .0001); on each item, 30–45% of participants reported lower self-efficacy following PGT. Change in self-efficacy was positively associated with health care provider consultation (p = .0042), impact of PGT on perceived control over one’s health (p < .0001), and perceived value of PGT (p < .0001), and negatively associated with decision regret (p < .0001). Conclusion: Lowered genetics self-efficacy following PGT may reflect an appropriate reevaluation by consumers in response to receiving complex genetic information.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/gim.2015.34
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4583799/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27320468
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