Increased stem density and competition may diminish the positive effects of warming at alpine treeline

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Increased stem density and competition may diminish the positive effects of warming at alpine treeline

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dc.contributor.author Wang, Yafeng
dc.contributor.author Pederson, Neil
dc.contributor.author Ellison, Aaron M.
dc.contributor.author Buckley, Hannah L.
dc.contributor.author Case, Bradley
dc.contributor.author Liang, Eryuan
dc.contributor.author Camarero, J Julio
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-28T15:30:33Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier Quick submit: 2016-02-24T08:17:31-05:00
dc.identifier.citation Wang, Yafeng, Neil Pederson, Aaron M. Ellison, Hannah L. Buckley, Bradley S. Case, Eryuan Liang, and J Julio Camarero. 2016. “Increased Stem Density and Competition May Diminish the Positive Effects of Warming at Alpine Treeline.” Ecology (March). Portico. doi:10.1890/15-1264.1. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0012-9658 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27409111
dc.description.abstract The most widespread response to global warming among alpine treeline ecotones is not an upward shift, but an increase in tree density. However, the impact of increasing density on interactions among trees at treeline is not well understood. Here, we test if treeline densification induced by climatic warming leads to increasing intraspecific competition. We mapped and measured the size and age of Smith fir trees growing in two treelines located in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. We used spatial point-pattern and codispersion analyses to describe the spatial association and covariation among seedlings, juveniles, and adults grouped in 30-year age classes from the 1860s to the present. Effects of competition on tree height and regeneration were inferred from bivariate mark-correlations. Since the 1950s, a rapid densification occurred at both sites in response to climatic warming. Competition between adults and juveniles or seedlings at small scales intensified as density increased. Encroachment negatively affected height growth and further reduced recruitment around mature trees. We infer that tree recruitment at the study treelines was more cold-limited prior to 1950 and shifted to a less temperature-constrained regime in response to climatic warming. Therefore, the ongoing densification and encroachment of alpine treelines could alter the way climate drives their transitions towards subalpine forests. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Organismic and Evolutionary Biology en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Wiley-Blackwell en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi:10.1890/15-1264.1 en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.title Increased stem density and competition may diminish the positive effects of warming at alpine treeline en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.date.updated 2016-02-24T13:17:34Z
dc.description.version Accepted Manuscript en_US
dc.rights.holder Y. Wang, N. Pederson, A.M. Ellison, H.L. Buckley, B.S. Case, E. Liang, J.J. Camarero
dc.relation.journal Ecology en_US
dash.depositing.author Ellison, Aaron M.
dc.date.available 2016-06-28T15:30:33Z

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