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dc.contributor.authorKoski-Karell, Victoriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, Paul Een_US
dc.contributor.authorIsaac, Benitoen_US
dc.contributor.authorCampa, Elizabeth Men_US
dc.contributor.authorViaud, Louneen_US
dc.contributor.authorNamphy, Paul Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorTernier, Ralphen_US
dc.contributor.authorIvers, Louise Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-14T19:17:00Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.citationKoski-Karell, Victoria, Paul E Farmer, Benito Isaac, Elizabeth M Campa, Loune Viaud, Paul C Namphy, Ralph Ternier, and Louise C Ivers. 2016. “Haiti’s progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cured.” Risk Management and Healthcare Policy 9 (1): 87-100. doi:10.2147/RMHP.S75919. http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RMHP.S75919.en
dc.identifier.issn1179-1594en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27662214
dc.description.abstractSince the beginning of the cholera epidemic in Haiti 5 years ago, the prevalence of this deadly water-borne disease has fallen far below the initial rates registered during its explosive outset. However, cholera continues to cause extensive suffering and needless deaths across the country, particularly among the poor. The urgent need to eliminate transmission of cholera persists: compared to the same period in 2014, the first 4 months of 2015 saw three times the number of cholera cases. Drawing upon epidemiology, clinical work (and clinical knowledge), policy, ecology, and political economy, and informed by ethnographic data collected in a rural area of Haiti called Bocozel, this paper evaluates the progress of the nation’s 10-year Plan for the Elimination of Cholera. Bocozel is a rice-producing region where most people live in extreme poverty. The irrigation network is decrepit, the land is prone to environmental shocks, fertilizer is not affordable, and the government’s capacity to assist farmers is undermined by resource constraints. When peasants do have rice to sell, the price of domestically grown rice is twice that of US-imported rice. Canal water is not only used to irrigate thousands of acres of rice paddies and sustain livestock, but also to bathe, wash, and play, while water from wells, hand pumps, and the river is used for drinking, cooking, and bathing. Only one out of the three government-sponsored water treatment stations in the research area is still functional and utilized by those who can afford it. Latrines are scarce and often shared by up to 30 people; open defecation remains common. Structural vulnerabilities cut across all sectors – not just water, sanitation, health care, and education, but agriculture, environment, (global and local) commerce, transportation, and governance as well. These are among the hidden sicknesses that impede Haiti and its partners’ capacity to eliminate cholera.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherDove Medical Pressen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.2147/RMHP.S75919en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4888864/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectwateren
dc.subjectsanitationen
dc.subjectWASHen
dc.subjectoral cholera vaccinationen
dc.subjecteliminationen
dc.titleHaiti’s progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cureden
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalRisk Management and Healthcare Policyen
dash.depositing.authorFarmer, Paul Een_US
dc.date.available2016-07-14T19:17:00Z
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/RMHP.S75919*
dash.contributor.affiliatedFarmer, Paul


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