Time Course of Heart Rate Variability Response to PM2.5 Exposure from Secondhand Smoke

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Time Course of Heart Rate Variability Response to PM2.5 Exposure from Secondhand Smoke

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Title: Time Course of Heart Rate Variability Response to PM2.5 Exposure from Secondhand Smoke
Author: Garza, Jennifer L.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Zhang, Jinming; Christiani, David C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M

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Citation: Garza, Jennifer L., Murray A. Mittleman, Jinming Zhang, David C. Christiani, and Jennifer M Cavallari. 2016. “Time Course of Heart Rate Variability Response to PM2.5 Exposure from Secondhand Smoke.” PLoS ONE 11 (5): e0154783. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0154783. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154783.
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Abstract: Purpose: Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) has been associated with decreased heart rate variability (HRV). However, the time course of this association is unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the association between 15–240 minute SHS-related fine particulate matter (PM2.5) moving averages and indices of HRV. Methods: With a panel study design, we used personal monitors to continuously measure PM2.5 and HRV of 35 participants who were exposed to SHS for approximately 6 hours. Results: We observed negative, significant associations between 5-minute HRV indices and 15 minute PM2.5 moving averages and 240 minute PM2.5 moving averages: there was a significant (p<0.01) 7.5% decrease in the 5-minute square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal heart beats associated with (RMSSD), and a significant (p<0.01) 14.7% decrease in the 5-minute high frequency (HF) power associated with the 15 minute PM2.5 moving averages; there was also a significant (p<0.01) 46.9% decrease in the 5-minute RMSSD, and a significant (p<0.01) 77.7% decrease in the 5-minute high frequency (HF) power associated with the 240 minute PM2.5 moving averages. Conclusions: Our findings that exposure to SHS related PM2.5 was associated with HRV support the hypothesis that SHS can affect the cardiovascular system. The negative associations reported between short and longer term PM2.5 and HRV indicate adverse effects of SHS on the cardiovascular system.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0154783
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4880193/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27662307
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