The Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Allergic Diseases in New Zealand Preschool Children

DSpace/Manakin Repository

The Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Allergic Diseases in New Zealand Preschool Children

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: The Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Allergic Diseases in New Zealand Preschool Children
Author: Cairncross, Carolyn; Grant, Cameron; Stonehouse, Welma; Conlon, Cath; McDonald, Barry; Houghton, Lisa; Eyles, Darryl; Camargo, Carlos A.; Coad, Jane; von Hurst, Pamela

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Cairncross, Carolyn, Cameron Grant, Welma Stonehouse, Cath Conlon, Barry McDonald, Lisa Houghton, Darryl Eyles, Carlos A. Camargo, Jane Coad, and Pamela von Hurst. 2016. “The Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Allergic Diseases in New Zealand Preschool Children.” Nutrients 8 (6): 326. doi:10.3390/nu8060326. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu8060326.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Recent research on vitamin D in young children has expanded from bone development to exploring immunomodulatory effects. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of vitamin D status and allergic diseases in preschool-aged children in New Zealand. Dried capillary blood spots were collected from 1329 children during late-winter to early-spring for 25(OH)D measurement by LC-MS/MS. Caregivers completed a questionnaire about their child’s recent medical history. Analysis was by multivariable logistic regression. Mean 25(OH)D concentration was 52(SD19) nmol/L, with 7% of children <25 nmol/L and 49% <50 nmol/L. Children with 25(OH)D concentrations ≥75 nmol/L (n = 29) had a two-fold increased risk for parent-report of doctor-diagnosed food allergy compared to children with 25(OH)D 50–74.9 nmol/L (OR = 2.21, 1.33–3.68, p = 0.002). No associations were present between 25(OH)D concentration and presence of parent-reported eczema, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic asthma. Vitamin D deficiency was not associated with several allergic diseases in these New Zealand preschool children. In contrast, high 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with a two-fold increased risk of parental-report food allergy. This increase supports further research into the association between vitamin D status and allergic disease in preschool children.
Published Version: doi:10.3390/nu8060326
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4924167/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:27822372
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters