Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNiznikiewicz, Margaret A.
dc.contributor.authorShenton, Martha Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorVoglmaier, Martina M.
dc.contributor.authorNestor, Paul Gerard
dc.contributor.authorDickey, Chandlee C.
dc.contributor.authorFrumin, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorSeidman, Larry Joel
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Christopher G.
dc.contributor.authorMcCarley, Robert William
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-15T20:14:24Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationNiznikiewicz, Margaret A., Martha E. Shenton, Martina Voglmaier, Paul G. Nestor, Chandlee C. Dickey, Melissa Frumin, Larry J. Seidman, Christopher G. Allen, and Robert W. McCarley. 2002. “Semantic Dysfunction in Women With Schizotypal Personality Disorder.” AJP 159 (10) (October): 1767–1774. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.159.10.1767.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-953Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:28520529
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study examined whether early or late processes in semantic networks were abnormal in women with a diagnosis of schizotypal personality disorder. The N400 component of the EEG event-related potentials was used as a probe of semantic processes. Method: Word pairs were presented with short and long stimulus-onset asynchronies to investigate, respectively, early and late semantic processes in 16 women with schizotypal personality disorder and 15 normal female comparison subjects. Event-related potentials were recorded in response to the last words in a pair. Results: With the short stimulus-onset asynchrony, the N400 amplitude was less negative in the schizotypal personality disorder group than in the normal comparison group. No group differences were found with the long stimulus-onset asynchrony. Conclusions: The finding of a less negative than normal N400 amplitude with the short stimulus-onset asynchrony in women with schizotypal personality disorder supports the hypothesis that persons with this disorder evince an overactivation of semantic networks. The absence of group differences with the long stimulus-onset asynchrony, which is primarily sensitive to processes involved in context integration, suggests that in this group of schizotypal personality disorder subjects, additional demands on working memory may be necessary to bring out the semantic dysfunction.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychiatric Publishingen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1176/appi.ajp.159.10.1767en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2845844/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleSemantic Dysfunction in Women With Schizotypal Personality Disorderen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalAmerican Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dash.depositing.authorShenton, Martha Elizabeth
dc.date.available2016-09-15T20:14:24Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ajp.159.10.1767*
dash.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4235-7879en_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedFrumin, Melissa
dash.contributor.affiliatedSeidman, Larry Joel
dash.contributor.affiliatedVoglmaier, Martina
dash.contributor.affiliatedNestor, Paul
dash.contributor.affiliatedDickey, Chandlee
dash.contributor.affiliatedMcCarley, Robert William
dash.contributor.affiliatedNiznikiewicz, Margaret
dash.contributor.affiliatedShenton, Martha
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5705-7495
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3191-2005


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record