A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States

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A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States

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Title: A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States
Author: Pinder, Leeya F.; Nelson, Brett D.; Eckardt, Melody; Goodman, Annekathryn

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Citation: Pinder, Leeya F., Brett D. Nelson, Melody Eckardt, and Annekathryn Goodman. 2016. “A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States.” Clinical Medicine Insights. Women's Health 9 (1): 21-26. doi:10.4137/CMWH.S39867. http://dx.doi.org/10.4137/CMWH.S39867.
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Abstract: African-born immigrants comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S., nearly doubling its population size in recent years. However, it is also one of the most underrepresented groups in health-care research, especially research focused on gynecologic and breast malignancies. While the opportunity exists for access to an advanced health-care system, as immigrants migrate to the U.S., they encounter the same health-care inequalities that are faced by the native-born population based on ethnicity and social class, potentiated by limitations of health literacy and lack of familiarity with U.S. health systems. Given the continued influx of African-born immigrants in the U.S., we sought to understand the representation of this population in cervical and breast cancer research, recognizing the population’s high risk for these diseases at baseline while residing in their native countries. We determined that there is limited research in these diseases that disproportionately affect them; yet, there are identifiable and potentially modifiable factors that contribute to this paucity of evidence. This clinical commentary seeks to underscore the clear lack of research available involving African-born immigrants with respect to gynecologic and breast malignancies in the existing literature, demonstrate the need for more robust research in this population, and provide fundamental insights into barriers and solutions critical to the continued health of this growing population.
Published Version: doi:10.4137/CMWH.S39867
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965016/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29002391
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