Burn injury differentially alters whole-blood and organ glutathione synthesis rates: An experimental model

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Burn injury differentially alters whole-blood and organ glutathione synthesis rates: An experimental model

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Title: Burn injury differentially alters whole-blood and organ glutathione synthesis rates: An experimental model
Author: Fei, Zhe-Wei; Young, Vernon R.; Lu, Xiao-Ming; Rhodes, Andrew B.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Fischman, Alan J.; Yu, Yong-Ming

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Citation: Fei, Zhe-Wei, Vernon R. Young, Xiao-Ming Lu, Andrew B. Rhodes, Ronald G. Tompkins, Alan J. Fischman, and Yong-Ming Yu. 2013. “Burn injury differentially alters whole-blood and organ glutathione synthesis rates: An experimental model.” Burns & Trauma 1 (2): 87-94. doi:10.4103/2321-3868.118934. http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2321-3868.118934.
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Abstract: Previous studies from our laboratories revealed a reduced rate of whole-blood (WB) glutathione (GSH) synthesis in severely burned patients. To determine whether WB GSH metabolism is an indicator of the status of GSH metabolism in one or more of the major organs, we used a burn rabbit model to determine GSH concentrations and rates of synthesis in WB, liver, lungs, kidney, and skeletal muscle. L-[1-13C]-cysteine was infused intravenously for 6 h in rabbits at 3 days post-burn and in sham burn controls. WB and organ 13C-enrichment of cysteine and GSH was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Plasma cysteine metabolic flux was increased significantly (P < 0.01) following burn injury. WB, liver, and lung GSH concentrations (P = 0.054, P < 0.05, and P < 0.05, respectively) and fractional rates of GSH synthesis (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.05, respectively) were reduced at 3 days post-burn. Kidney was unaffected. There also appears to be an increased rate of GSH transport out of the liver after burn injury. Hence, there is a differential impact of burn injury on tissue and organ GSH status, with WB qualitatively reflecting the changes in lung and liver. It will be important to determine whether these changes are due to alterations in the intrinsic capacity for GSH synthesis and/or availability of amino acid precursors of GSH.
Published Version: doi:10.4103/2321-3868.118934
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4978103/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29002431
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