Modeling the efficacy of the extent of surgical resection in the setting of radiation therapy for glioblastoma

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Modeling the efficacy of the extent of surgical resection in the setting of radiation therapy for glioblastoma

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Title: Modeling the efficacy of the extent of surgical resection in the setting of radiation therapy for glioblastoma
Author: Hathout, Leith; Ellingson, Benjamin; Pope, Whitney

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Citation: Hathout, Leith, Benjamin Ellingson, and Whitney Pope. 2016. “Modeling the efficacy of the extent of surgical resection in the setting of radiation therapy for glioblastoma.” Cancer Science 107 (8): 1110-1116. doi:10.1111/cas.12979. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cas.12979.
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Abstract: Standard therapy for glioblastoma (GBM) includes maximal surgical resection and radiation therapy. While it is established that radiation therapy provides the greatest survival benefit of standard treatment modalities, the impact of the extent of surgical resection (EOR) on patient outcome remains highly controversial. While some studies describe no correlation between EOR and patient survival even up to total resection, others propose either qualitative (partial versus subtotal versus complete resection) or quantitative EOR thresholds, below which there is no correlation with survival. This work uses a mathematical model in the form of a reaction–diffusion partial differential equation to simulate tumor growth and treatment with radiation therapy and surgical resection based on tumor‐specific rates of diffusion and proliferation. Simulation of 36 tumors across a wide spectrum of diffusion and proliferation rates suggests that while partial or subtotal resections generally do not provide a survival advantage, complete resection significantly improves patient outcomes. Furthermore, our model predicts a tumor‐specific quantitative threshold below which EOR has no effect on patient survival and demonstrates that this threshold increases with tumor aggressiveness, particularly with the rate of proliferation. Thus, this model may serve as an aid for determining both when surgical resection is indicated as well as the surgical margins necessary to provide clinically significant improvements in patient survival. In addition, by assigning relative benefits to radiation and surgical resection based on tumor invasiveness and proliferation, this model confirms that (with the exception of the least aggressive tumors) the survival benefit of radiation therapy exceeds that of surgical resection.
Published Version: doi:10.1111/cas.12979
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4982585/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29002434
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