Triatomine Infestation in Guatemala: Spatial Assessment after Two Rounds of Vector Control

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Triatomine Infestation in Guatemala: Spatial Assessment after Two Rounds of Vector Control

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Triatomine Infestation in Guatemala: Spatial Assessment after Two Rounds of Vector Control
Author: Manne, Jennifer Michele; Nakagawa, Jun; Yamagata, Y.; Goehler, A; Brownstein, John Samuel; Castro, Marcia C.de

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Manne, J., J. Nakagawa, Y. Yamagata, A. Goehler, J. S. Brownstein, and M. C. Castro. 2012. “Triatomine Infestation in Guatemala: Spatial Assessment after Two Rounds of Vector Control.” American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 86 (3) (March 1): 446–454. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2012.11-0052.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: In 2000, the Guatemalan Ministry of Health initiated a Chagas disease program to control Rhodnius prolixus and Triatoma dimidiata by periodic house spraying with pyrethroid insecticides to characterize infestation patterns and analyze the contribution of programmatic practices to these patterns. Spatial infestation patterns at three time points were identified using the Getis-Ord Gi*(d) test. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors of reinfestation after pyrethroid insecticide administration. Spatial analysis showed high and low clusters of infestation at three time points. After two rounds of spray, 178 communities persistently fell in high infestation clusters. A time lapse between rounds of vector control greater than 6 months was associated with 1.54 (95% confidence interval = 1.07-2.23) times increased odds of reinfestation after first spray, whereas a time lapse of greater than 1 year was associated with 2.66 (95% confidence interval = 1.85-3.83) times increased odds of reinfestation after first spray compared with localities where the time lapse was less than 180 days. The time lapse between rounds of vector control should remain under 1 year. Spatial analysis can guide targeted vector control efforts by enabling tracking of reinfestation hotspots and improved targeting of resources.
Published Version: doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2012.11-0052
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29048921
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters