Obstructive sleep apnea and quality of life: comparison of the SAQLI, FOSQ, and SF-36 questionnaires

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Obstructive sleep apnea and quality of life: comparison of the SAQLI, FOSQ, and SF-36 questionnaires

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Title: Obstructive sleep apnea and quality of life: comparison of the SAQLI, FOSQ, and SF-36 questionnaires
Author: Silva, Graciela; Goodwin, James; Vana, Kimberly; Quan, Stuart Fun

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Silva, Graciela, James Goodwin, Kimberly Vana, and Stuart Quan. 2016. “Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Quality of Life: Comparison of the SAQLI, FOSQ, and SF-36 Questionnaires.” Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care 13 (3) (September 24): 137–149. doi:10.13175/swjpcc082-16.
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Abstract: Introduction: The impact of sleep on quality of life (QoL) has been well documented; however, there is a great need for reliable QoL measures for persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We compared the QoL scores between the 36-Item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Survey (SF-36), Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI), and Functional Outcomes Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) in persons with OSA.

Methods: A total of 884 participants from the Sleep Heart Health Study second examination, who completed the SF-36, FOSQ, and SAQLI, and in-home polysomnograms, were included. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI) at 4% desaturation was categorized as no OSA (<5 /hour), mild to moderate OSA (5–30 /hour) and severe OSA (>30 /hour). QoL scores for each questionnaire were determined and compared by OSA severity category and by gender.

Results: Participants were 47.6% male, 49.2% (n=435) had no OSA, 43.2% (n=382) had mild to moderate OSA, and 7.6% (n=67) had severe OSA. Participants with severe OSA were significantly older (mean age = 63.7 years, p <.0001), had higher BMI (mean = 34.3 kg/m2, p <.0001) and had lower SF-36 Physical Component scores (PCS) (45.1) than participants with no OSA (48.5) or those with mild to moderate OSA (46.5, p= .006). When analyzed according to gender, no significant differences were found in males for QoL by OSA severity categories. However, females with severe OSA had significantly lower mean scores for the SAQLI (5.4, p= .006), FOSQ (10.9, p= .02), and SF-36 PCS (37.7, p<.0001) compared to females with no OSA (6.0, 11.5, 44.6) and those with mild to moderate OSA (5.9, 11.4, 48, respectively). Females with severe OSA also had significantly higher mean BMI (41.8 kg/m2,) than females with no OSA (26.5 kg/m2) or females with mild to moderate OSA (30.6 kg/m2, p<.0001). The SF-36 PCS and Mental Component Scores (MCS) were correlated with the FOSQ and SAQLI (r=.37 PCS vs FOSQ; r=.31 MCS vs FOSQ; r=.42 PCS vs SAQLI; r=.52 MCS vs SAQLI; and r=.66 FOSQ vs SAQLI, p<.001 for all correlations). Linear regression analyses, adjusting for potential confounders, indicated that the impact of OSA severity on QoL is largely explained by the presence of daytime sleepiness.

Conclusion: The impact of OSA on QoL differs between genders with a larger effect on females and is largely explained by the presence of daytime sleepiness. Correlations among QoL instruments are not high and various instruments may assess different aspects of QoL.
Published Version: doi:10.13175/swjpcc082-16
Other Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5058363/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29323484
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