The impact of race and ethnicity on mortality and healthcare utilization in alcoholic hepatitis: a cross-sectional study

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The impact of race and ethnicity on mortality and healthcare utilization in alcoholic hepatitis: a cross-sectional study

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Title: The impact of race and ethnicity on mortality and healthcare utilization in alcoholic hepatitis: a cross-sectional study
Author: May, Folasade P.; Rolston, Vineet S.; Tapper, Elliot B.; Lakshmanan, Ashwini; Saab, Sammy; Sundaram, Vinay

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Citation: May, Folasade P., Vineet S. Rolston, Elliot B. Tapper, Ashwini Lakshmanan, Sammy Saab, and Vinay Sundaram. 2016. “The impact of race and ethnicity on mortality and healthcare utilization in alcoholic hepatitis: a cross-sectional study.” BMC Gastroenterology 16 (1): 129. doi:10.1186/s12876-016-0544-y. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12876-016-0544-y.
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Abstract: Background: Alcoholic Hepatitis (AH) is major source of alcohol-related mortality and health care expenditures in the United States. There is insufficient information regarding the role of race and ethnicity on healthcare utilization and outcomes for patients with AH. We aimed to determine whether there are racial/ethnic differences in resource utilization and inpatient mortality in patients hospitalized with AH. Methods: We analyzed data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), years 2008–2011. We calculated demographic, clinical, and healthcare utilization characteristics by race. We then performed logistic regression and generalized linear modeling with gamma distribution (log link), respectively, to determine predictors of inpatient morality and total hospital costs (THC). Results: We identified 11,304 AH patients from 2008 to 2011. Mean age was 47.0 years, and 62.1 % were male, 61.9 % were white, 9.8 % were black, and 9.7 % were Hispanic. Mean LOS was 6.3 days and significantly longer in whites (6.5 d) than both blacks (5.4 d) and Hispanics (5.9 d). In adjusted models, inpatient mortality was lower for blacks than for whites (adj. OR = 0.50; 95 % CI = 0.32–0.78). THC was significantly higher for Hispanics than whites (fold increase = 1.25; 95 % CI = 1.01–1.49). Conclusions: We identified differences in healthcare utilization and mortality by race/ethnicity. THC was significantly higher among Hispanics than for whites and blacks. We also demonstrated lower inpatient mortality in blacks compared to whites. These variations may implicate racial and ethnic differences in access to care, quality of care, severity of AH on presentation, or other factors. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12876-016-0544-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s12876-016-0544-y
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5057210/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29408163
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