Association between allergic conditions and risk of prostate cancer: A Prisma-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Association between allergic conditions and risk of prostate cancer: A Prisma-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Title: Association between allergic conditions and risk of prostate cancer: A Prisma-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Author: Zhu, Jianguo; Song, Jukun; Liu, Zezhen; Han, Jin; Luo, Heng; Liu, Yunlin; Jia, Zhenyu; Dong, Yuanbo; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Funeng; Wu, Chinlee; Sun, Zaolin; Zhong, Weide

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Zhu, J., J. Song, Z. Liu, J. Han, H. Luo, Y. Liu, Z. Jia, et al. 2016. “Association between allergic conditions and risk of prostate cancer: A Prisma-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Scientific Reports 6 (1): 35682. doi:10.1038/srep35682. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep35682.
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Abstract: Association between allergic conditions and prostate cancer risk has been investigated for many years. However, the results from available evidence for the association are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between allergic conditions (asthma, atopy, hay fever and “any allergy”) and risk of prostate cancer. The PubMed and Embase databases were searched to screen observational studies meeting our meta-analysis criteria. Study selection and data extraction from included studies were independently performed by two authors. Twenty studies were considered eligible involving 5 case-control studies and 15 cohort studies. The summary relative risk (RR) for developing prostate cancer risk was 1.04 (95%CI: 0.92–1.17) for asthma, and 1.25 (95%CI: 0.74–2.10) for atopy, 1.04 (95%CI: 0.99–1.09) for hay fever, 0.96 (95%CI: 0.86–1.06) for any allergy. In the Subgroup and sensitivity analysis, similar results were produced. Little evidence of publication bias was observed. The present meta-analysis of observational studies indicates that no indication of an association between allergic conditions and risk of prostate cancer was found, and the meta-analysis does not support neither the original hypothesis of an overall cancer protective effect of allergic conditions, nor that of an opposite effect in the development of prostate cancer.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/srep35682
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5073359/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29408184
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