Methazolamide improves neurological behavior by inhibition of neuron apoptosis in subarachnoid hemorrhage mice

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Methazolamide improves neurological behavior by inhibition of neuron apoptosis in subarachnoid hemorrhage mice

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Title: Methazolamide improves neurological behavior by inhibition of neuron apoptosis in subarachnoid hemorrhage mice
Author: Li, Mingchang; Wang, Wei; Mai, Haojian; Zhang, Xinmu; Wang, Jian; Gao, Yufeng; Wang, Yuefei; Deng, Gang; Gao, Ling; Zhou, Shuanhu; Chen, Qianxue; Wang, Xin

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Citation: Li, M., W. Wang, H. Mai, X. Zhang, J. Wang, Y. Gao, Y. Wang, et al. 2016. “Methazolamide improves neurological behavior by inhibition of neuron apoptosis in subarachnoid hemorrhage mice.” Scientific Reports 6 (1): 35055. doi:10.1038/srep35055. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep35055.
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Abstract: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) results in significant nerve dysfunction, such as hemiplegia, mood disorders, cognitive and memory impairment. Currently, no clear measures can reduce brain nerve damage. The study of brain nerve protection after SAH is of great significance. We aim to evaluate the protective effects and the possible mechanism of methazolamide in C57BL/6J SAH animal model in vivo and in blood-induced primary cortical neuron (PCNs) cellular model of SAH in vitro. We demonstrate that methazolamide accelerates the recovery of neurological damage, effectively relieves cerebral edema, and improves cognitive function in SAH mice as well as offers neuroprotection in blood- or hemoglobin-treated PCNs and partially restores normal neuronal morphology. In addition, western blot analyses show obviously decreased expression of active caspase-3 in methazolamide-treated SAH mice comparing with vehicle-treated SAH animals. Furthermore, methazolamide effectively inhibits ROS production in PCNs induced by blood exposure or hemoglobin insult. However, methazolamide has no protective effects in morality, fluctuation of cerebral blood flow, SAH grade, and cerebral vasospasm of SAH mice. Given methazolamide, a potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, can penetrate the blood–brain barrier and has been used in clinic in the treatment of ocular conditions, it provides potential as a novel therapy for SAH.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/srep35055
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5059745/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29408266
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