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dc.contributor.authorGlaeser, Edward
dc.contributor.authorKahn, Matthew E.
dc.contributor.authorRappaport, Jordan
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-14T18:30:49Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationGlaeser, Edward L., Matthew E. Kahn, and Jordan Rappaport. 2008. Why do the poor live in cities? The role of public transportation. Journal of Urban Economics 63, no. 1: 1-24.en
dc.identifier.issn0094-1190en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:2958224
dc.description.abstractMore than 19 percent of people in American central cities are poor. In suburbs, just 7.5 percent of people live in poverty. The income elasticity of demand for land is too low for urban poverty to come from wealthy individuals' wanting to live where land is cheap (the traditional explanation of urban poverty). A significant income elasticity for land exists only because the rich eschew apartment living, and that elasticity is still too low to explain the poor's urbanization. The urbanization of poverty comes mainly from better access to public transportation in central cities.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomicsen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jue.2006.12.004en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.zimancenter.com/WorkingPapers/2007-12.pdfen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleWhy Do The Poor Live In Cities? The Role of Public Transportationen
dc.relation.journalJournal of Urban Economicsen
dash.depositing.authorGlaeser, Edward
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jue.2006.12.004*
dash.contributor.affiliatedGlaeser, Edward


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