UV fluorescence excitation imaging of healing of wounds in skin: Evaluation of wound closure in organ culture model

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UV fluorescence excitation imaging of healing of wounds in skin: Evaluation of wound closure in organ culture model

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Title: UV fluorescence excitation imaging of healing of wounds in skin: Evaluation of wound closure in organ culture model
Author: Wang, Ying; Gutierrez‐Herrera, Enoch; Ortega‐Martinez, Antonio; Anderson, Richard Rox; Franco, Walfre

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Citation: Wang, Ying, Enoch Gutierrez‐Herrera, Antonio Ortega‐Martinez, Richard Rox Anderson, and Walfre Franco. 2016. “UV fluorescence excitation imaging of healing of wounds in skin: Evaluation of wound closure in organ culture model.” Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 48 (7): 678-685. doi:10.1002/lsm.22523. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lsm.22523.
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Abstract: Background and Objective Molecules native to tissue that fluoresce upon light excitation can serve as reporters of cellular activity and protein structure. In skin, the fluorescence ascribed to tryptophan is a marker of cellular proliferation, whereas the fluorescence ascribed to cross‐links of collagen is a structural marker. In this work, we introduce and demonstrate a simple but robust optical method to image the functional process of epithelialization and the exposed dermal collagen in wound healing of human skin in an organ culture model. Materials and Methods Non‐closing non‐grafted, partial closing non‐grafted, and grafted wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and kept in culture. A wide‐field UV fluorescence excitation imaging system was used to visualize epithelialization of the exposed dermis and quantitate wound area, closure, and gap. Histology (H&E staining) was also used to evaluate epithelialization. Results: The endogenous fluorescence excitation of cross‐links of collagen at 335 nm clearly shows the dermis missing epithelium, while the endogenous fluorescence excitation of tryptophan at 295 nm shows keratinocytes in higher proliferating state. The size of the non‐closing wound was 11.4 ± 1.8 mm and remained constant during the observation period, while the partial‐close wound reached 65.5 ± 4.9% closure by day 16. Evaluations of wound gaps using fluorescence excitation images and histology images are in agreement. Conclusions: We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes, evaluating keratinocyte proliferation, and quantitating closure during wound healing of skin in an organ culture model: the dermal fluorescence of pepsin‐digestible collagen cross‐links can be used to quantitate wound size, closure extents, and gaps; and, the epidermal fluorescence ascribed to tryptophan can be used to monitor and quantitate functional states of epithelialization. UV fluorescence excitation imaging has the potential to become a valuable tool for research, diagnostic and educational purposes on evaluating the healing of wounds. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:678–685, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Published Version: doi:10.1002/lsm.22523
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5074320/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29625978
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