Gender Differences in Sustained Attentional Control Relate to Gender Inequality across Countries

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Gender Differences in Sustained Attentional Control Relate to Gender Inequality across Countries

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Title: Gender Differences in Sustained Attentional Control Relate to Gender Inequality across Countries
Author: Riley, Elizabeth; Okabe, Hidefusa; Germine, Laura; Wilmer, Jeremy; Esterman, Michael; DeGutis, Joseph

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Citation: Riley, Elizabeth, Hidefusa Okabe, Laura Germine, Jeremy Wilmer, Michael Esterman, and Joseph DeGutis. 2016. “Gender Differences in Sustained Attentional Control Relate to Gender Inequality across Countries.” PLoS ONE 11 (11): e0165100. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0165100. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0165100.
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Abstract: Sustained attentional control is critical for everyday tasks and success in school and employment. Understanding gender differences in sustained attentional control, and their potential sources, is an important goal of psychology and neuroscience and of great relevance to society. We used a large web-based sample (n = 21,484, from testmybrain.org) to examine gender differences in sustained attentional control. Our sample included participants from 41 countries, allowing us to examine how gender differences in each country relate to national indices of gender equality. We found significant gender differences in certain aspects of sustained attentional control. Using indices of gender equality, we found that overall sustained attentional control performance was lower in countries with less equality and that there were greater gender differences in performance in countries with less equality. These findings suggest that creating sociocultural conditions which value women and men equally can improve a component of sustained attention and reduce gender disparities in cognition.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0165100
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5089545/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29626138
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