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dc.contributor.authorBlair, Ann M.
dc.contributor.authorMilligan, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-13T18:52:41Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationBlair, Ann, and Jennifer Milligan. 2007. “Introduction.” Archival Science 7 (4) (December): 289–296. doi:10.1007/s10502-008-9069-7.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1389-0166en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29674917
dc.description.abstractArchives -- collections of paper, books, and other substrates of information (some might say “memory”) and the institutions that house and manage these objects -- are subjects of a renewed and vital current critical historical interest. Archives, broadly conceived, have been used for the writing of history since historical writing began, and archival materials and institutions are an integral part of the making not just of history but of the modern historical profession as well. The historian’s relationship with the archive has been long and varied and described in a broad range of terms, as being as unproblematic as “bread and butter” (Giles 1996) or as driven by erotic, fetishistic desire (Smith 1998). It is fitting that historians should turn their scholarly attentions to these depositories that have been the object, if not the subject, of so much historical worken_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHistory of Scienceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1007/s10502-008-9069-7en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleIntroductionen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalArchival Scienceen_US
dash.depositing.authorBlair, Ann M.
dc.date.available2016-12-13T18:52:41Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10502-008-9069-7*
dash.contributor.affiliatedBlair, Ann


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