Clinical, physiologic, and radiographic factors contributing to development of hypoxemia in moderate to severe COPD: a cohort study

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Clinical, physiologic, and radiographic factors contributing to development of hypoxemia in moderate to severe COPD: a cohort study

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Title: Clinical, physiologic, and radiographic factors contributing to development of hypoxemia in moderate to severe COPD: a cohort study
Author: Wells, J. Michael; Estepar, Raul San Jose; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Bhatt, Surya P.; Diaz, Alejandro A.; Bailey, William C.; Jacobson, Francine L.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Washko, George R.; Make, Barry J.; Casaburi, Richard; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Wells, J. M., R. S. J. Estepar, M. N. McDonald, S. P. Bhatt, A. A. Diaz, W. C. Bailey, F. L. Jacobson, et al. 2016. “Clinical, physiologic, and radiographic factors contributing to development of hypoxemia in moderate to severe COPD: a cohort study.” BMC Pulmonary Medicine 16 (1): 169. doi:10.1186/s12890-016-0331-0. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12890-016-0331-0.
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Abstract: Background: Hypoxemia is a major complication of COPD and is a strong predictor of mortality. We previously identified independent risk factors for the presence of resting hypoxemia in the COPDGene cohort. However, little is known about characteristics that predict onset of resting hypoxemia in patients who are normoxic at baseline. We hypothesized that a combination of clinical, physiologic, and radiographic characteristics would predict development of resting hypoxemia after 5-years of follow-up in participants with moderate to severe COPD Methods: We analyzed 678 participants with moderate-to-severe COPD recruited into the COPDGene cohort who completed baseline and 5-year follow-up visits and who were normoxic by pulse oximetry at baseline. Development of resting hypoxemia was defined as an oxygen saturation ≤88% on ambient air at rest during follow-up. Demographic and clinical characteristics, lung function, and radiographic indices were analyzed with logistic regression models to identify predictors of the development of hypoxemia. Results: Forty-six participants (7%) developed resting hypoxemia at follow-up. Enrollment at Denver (OR 8.30, 95%CI 3.05–22.6), lower baseline oxygen saturation (OR 0.70, 95%CI 0.58–0.85), self-reported heart failure (OR 6.92, 95%CI 1.56–30.6), pulmonary artery (PA) enlargement on computed tomography (OR 2.81, 95%CI 1.17–6.74), and prior severe COPD exacerbation (OR 3.31, 95%CI 1.38–7.90) were independently associated with development of resting hypoxemia. Participants who developed hypoxemia had greater decline in 6-min walk distance and greater 5-year decline in quality of life compared to those who remained normoxic at follow-up. Conclusions: Development of clinically significant hypoxemia over a 5-year span is associated with comorbid heart failure, PA enlargement and severe COPD exacerbation. Further studies are needed to determine if treatments targeting these factors can prevent new onset hypoxemia. Trial registration COPDGene is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00608764 (Registration Date: January 28, 2008) Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12890-016-0331-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s12890-016-0331-0
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5131397/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29738930
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