Normal Wound Healing and Tumor Angiogenesis as a Game of Competitive Inhibition

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Normal Wound Healing and Tumor Angiogenesis as a Game of Competitive Inhibition

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Title: Normal Wound Healing and Tumor Angiogenesis as a Game of Competitive Inhibition
Author: Kareva, Irina; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Dodd, Oliver; Dashevsky, Olga; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

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Citation: Kareva, Irina, Abdo Abou-Slaybi, Oliver Dodd, Olga Dashevsky, and Giannoula Lakka Klement. 2016. “Normal Wound Healing and Tumor Angiogenesis as a Game of Competitive Inhibition.” PLoS ONE 11 (12): e0166655. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0166655. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0166655.
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Abstract: Both normal wound healing and tumor angiogenesis are mitigated by the sequential, carefully orchestrated release of growth stimulators and inhibitors. These regulators are released from platelet clots formed at the sites of activated endothelium in a temporally and spatially controlled manner, and the order of their release depends on their affinity to glycosaminoglycans (GAG) such as heparan sulfate (HS) within the extracellular matrix, and platelet open canallicular system. The formation of vessel sprouts, triggered by angiogenesis regulating factors with lowest affinities for heparan sulfate (e.g. VEGF), is followed by vessel-stabilizing PDGF-B or bFGF with medium affinity for HS, and by inhibitors such as PF-4 and TSP-1 with the highest affinities for HS. The invasive wound-like edge of growing tumors has an overabundance of angiogenesis stimulators, and we propose that their abundance out-competes angiogenesis inhibitors, effectively preventing inhibition of angiogenesis and vessel maturation. We evaluate this hypothesis using an experimentally motivated agent-based model, and propose a general theoretical framework for understanding mechanistic similarities and differences between the processes of normal wound healing and pathological angiogenesis from the point of view of competitive inhibition.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0166655
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5147849/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29739045
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