Neurochemical changes in patients with chronic low back pain detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A systematic review

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Neurochemical changes in patients with chronic low back pain detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A systematic review

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Title: Neurochemical changes in patients with chronic low back pain detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A systematic review
Author: Zhao, Xianjing; Xu, Maosheng; Jorgenson, Kristen; Kong, Jian

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Citation: Zhao, Xianjing, Maosheng Xu, Kristen Jorgenson, and Jian Kong. 2016. “Neurochemical changes in patients with chronic low back pain detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A systematic review.” NeuroImage : Clinical 13 (1): 33-38. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2016.11.006. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2016.11.006.
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Abstract: Background: Low back pain is a highly prevalent health problem around the world, affecting 50% to 85% of people at some point in life. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the previous proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies on brain chemical changes in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Methods: We identified relevant studies from a literature search of PubMed and EMBASE from 1980 to March 2016. Data extraction was performed on the subjects' characteristics, MRS methods, spectral analyses, cerebral metabolites and perceptual measurements. Results: The review identified 9 studies that met the inclusion criteria, comprised of data on 135 CLBP subjects and 137 healthy controls. Seven of these studies reported statistically different neurochemical alterations in patients with CLBP. The results showed that compared to controls, CLBP patients showed reductions of 1) N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), right primary motor cortex, left somatosensory cortex (SSC), left anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC); 2) glutamate in the ACC; 3) myo-inositol in the ACC and thalamus; 4) choline in the right SSC; and 5) glucose in the DLPFC. Conclusion: This review provides evidence for alterations in the biochemical profile of the brain in patients with CLBP, which suggests that biochemical changes may play a significant role in the development and pathophysiology of CLBP and shed light on the development of new treatments for CLBP.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2016.11.006
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5126149/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29739092
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