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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Eugene T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKelly, J. Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarrie, Mohamed Bailoren_US
dc.contributor.authorMesman, Annelies W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKarku, Sahren_US
dc.contributor.authorQuiwa, Kombaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Regan H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKoedoyoma, Songoren_US
dc.contributor.authorDaboh, Fodeien_US
dc.contributor.authorBarron, Kathryn P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrady, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorDierberg, Kerry L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, George W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, James Hollanden_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Megan B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, Paul E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-03T23:50:19Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.citationRichardson, E. T., J. D. Kelly, M. B. Barrie, A. W. Mesman, S. Karku, K. Quiwa, R. H. Marsh, et al. 2016. “Minimally Symptomatic Infection in an Ebola ‘Hotspot’: A Cross-Sectional Serosurvey.” PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 10 (11): e0005087. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005087. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005087.en
dc.identifier.issn1935-2727en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29739149
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Evidence for minimally symptomatic Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is limited. During the 2013–16 outbreak in West Africa, it was not considered epidemiologically relevant to published models or projections of intervention effects. In order to improve our understanding of the transmission dynamics of EBOV in humans, we investigated the occurrence of minimally symptomatic EBOV infection in quarantined contacts of reported Ebola virus disease cases in a recognized ‘hotspot.’ Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a cross-sectional serosurvey in Sukudu, Kono District, Sierra Leone, from October 2015 to January 2016. A blood sample was collected from 187 study participants, 132 negative controls (individuals with a low likelihood of previous exposure to Ebola virus), and 30 positive controls (Ebola virus disease survivors). IgG responses to Ebola glycoprotein and nucleoprotein were measured using Alpha Diagnostic International ELISA kits with plasma diluted at 1:200. Optical density was read at 450 nm (subtracting OD at 630nm to normalize well background) on a ChroMate 4300 microplate reader. A cutoff of 4.7 U/mL for the anti-GP ELISA yielded 96.7% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity in distinguishing positive and negative controls. We identified 14 seropositive individuals not known to have had Ebola virus disease. Two of the 14 seropositive individuals reported only fever during quarantine while the remaining 12 denied any signs or symptoms during quarantine. Conclusions/Significance: By using ELISA to measure Zaire Ebola virus antibody concentrations, we identified a significant number of individuals with previously undetected EBOV infection in a ‘hotspot’ village in Sierra Leone, approximately one year after the village outbreak. The findings provide further evidence that Ebola, like many other viral infections, presents with a spectrum of clinical manifestations, including minimally symptomatic infection. These data also suggest that a significant portion of Ebola transmission events may have gone undetected during the outbreak. Further studies are needed to understand the potential risk of transmission and clinical sequelae in individuals with previously undetected EBOV infection.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005087en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5112953/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectTropical Diseasesen
dc.subjectNeglected Tropical Diseasesen
dc.subjectViral Hemorrhagic Feversen
dc.subjectEbola Hemorrhagic Feveren
dc.subjectInfectious Diseasesen
dc.subjectViral Diseasesen
dc.subjectImmunologic Techniquesen
dc.subjectImmunoassaysen
dc.subjectEnzyme-Linked Immunoassaysen
dc.subjectBiology and life sciencesen
dc.subjectOrganismsen
dc.subjectVirusesen
dc.subjectRNA virusesen
dc.subjectFilovirusesen
dc.subjectEbola Virusen
dc.subjectBiology and Life Sciencesen
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen
dc.subjectMedical Microbiologyen
dc.subjectMicrobial Pathogensen
dc.subjectViral Pathogensen
dc.subjectHemorrhagic Fever Virusesen
dc.subjectPathology and Laboratory Medicineen
dc.subjectPathogensen
dc.subjectDiagnostic Medicineen
dc.subjectSigns and Symptomsen
dc.subjectFeversen
dc.subjectPhysiologyen
dc.subjectImmune Physiologyen
dc.subjectAntibodiesen
dc.subjectImmunologyen
dc.subjectImmune System Proteinsen
dc.subjectBiochemistryen
dc.subjectProteinsen
dc.subjectPeople and placesen
dc.subjectGeographical locationsen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectSierra Leoneen
dc.subjectInfectious Disease Controlen
dc.subjectMolecular Biologyen
dc.subjectMolecular Biology Techniquesen
dc.subjectArtificial Gene Amplification and Extensionen
dc.subjectPolymerase Chain Reactionen
dc.subjectReverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reactionen
dc.titleMinimally Symptomatic Infection in an Ebola ‘Hotspot’: A Cross-Sectional Serosurveyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
dash.depositing.authorRichardson, Eugene T.en_US
dc.date.available2017-01-03T23:50:19Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0005087*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedMarsh, Regan
dash.contributor.affiliatedFarmer, Paul
dash.contributor.affiliatedRichardson, Eugene
dash.contributor.affiliatedDierberg, Kerry L.
dash.contributor.affiliatedMurray, Megan


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