Can purchasing information be used to predict adherence to cardiovascular medications? An analysis of linked retail pharmacy and insurance claims data

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Can purchasing information be used to predict adherence to cardiovascular medications? An analysis of linked retail pharmacy and insurance claims data

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Title: Can purchasing information be used to predict adherence to cardiovascular medications? An analysis of linked retail pharmacy and insurance claims data
Author: Krumme, Alexis A; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Franklin, Jessica M; Isaman, Danielle L; Mahesri, Mufaddal; Matlin, Olga S; Shrank, William H; Brennan, Troyen A; Brill, Gregory; Choudhry, Niteesh K

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Citation: Krumme, Alexis A, Gabriel Sanfélix-Gimeno, Jessica M Franklin, Danielle L Isaman, Mufaddal Mahesri, Olga S Matlin, William H Shrank, Troyen A Brennan, Gregory Brill, and Niteesh K Choudhry. 2016. “Can purchasing information be used to predict adherence to cardiovascular medications? An analysis of linked retail pharmacy and insurance claims data.” BMJ Open 6 (11): e011015. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-011015. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-011015.
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Abstract: Objective: The use of retail purchasing data may improve adherence prediction over approaches using healthcare insurance claims alone. Design: Retrospective. Setting and participants A cohort of patients who received prescription medication benefits through CVS Caremark, used a CVS Pharmacy ExtraCare Health Care (ECHC) loyalty card, and initiated a statin medication in 2011. Outcome We evaluated associations between retail purchasing patterns and optimal adherence to statins in the 12 subsequent months. Results: Among 11 010 statin initiators, 43% were optimally adherent at 12 months of follow-up. Greater numbers of store visits per month and dollar amount per visit were positively associated with optimal adherence, as was making a purchase on the same day as filling a prescription (p<0.0001 for all). Models to predict adherence using retail purchase variables had low discriminative ability (C-statistic: 0.563), while models with both clinical and retail purchase variables achieved a C-statistic of 0.617. Conclusions: While the use of retail purchases may improve the discriminative ability of claims-based approaches, these data alone appear inadequate for adherence prediction, even with the addition of more complex analytical approaches. Nevertheless, associations between retail purchasing behaviours and adherence could inform the development of quality improvement interventions.
Published Version: doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-011015
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5129090/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:29739215
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