SHP-2 complex formation with the SHP-2 substrate-1 during C2C12 myogenesis

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SHP-2 complex formation with the SHP-2 substrate-1 during C2C12 myogenesis

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Title: SHP-2 complex formation with the SHP-2 substrate-1 during C2C12 myogenesis
Author: Kontaridis, Maria Irene; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhang, Lang; Bennett, Anton

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Citation: Kontaridis, Maria, Xiangdong Liu, Lei Zhang, and Anton M. Bennett. 2001. SHP-2 complex formation with the SHP-2 substrate-1 during C2C12 myogenesis. Journal of Cell Science 114: 2187-2198.
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Abstract: Myogenesis is a highly ordered process that involves the expression of muscle-specific genes, cell-cell recognition and multinucleated myotube formation. Although protein tyrosine kinases have figured prominently in myogenesis, the involvement of tyrosine phosphatases in this process is unknown. SHP-2 is an SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase, which positively regulates growth and differentiation. We show that in C2C12 myoblasts, SHP-2 becomes upregulated early on during myogenesis and associates with a 120 kDa tyrosyl-phosphorylated complex. We have identified that the 120 kDa complex consists of the SHP-2 substrate-1 (SHPS-1) and the Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab-1). SHPS-1, but not Gab-1, undergoes tyrosyl phosphorylation and association with SHP-2 during myogenesis, the kinetics of which correlate with the expression of MyoD. Either constitutive expression or inducible activation of MyoD in 10T(1/2) fibroblasts promotes SHPS-1 tyrosyl phosphorylation and its association with SHP-2. It has been shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity is required for the expression/activation of MyoD and MyoD-responsive genes. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB203580 in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts blocks MyoD expression, SHPS-1 tyrosyl phosphorylation and the association of SHPS-1 with SHP-2. These data suggest that SHPS-1/SHP-2 complex formation is an integral signaling component of skeletal muscle differentiation.
Published Version: http://jcs.biologists.org/content/joces/114/11/2187.full.pdf
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:30203536
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