Potential Savings From Redetermining Disability Among Children Receiving Supplemental Security Income Benefits

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Potential Savings From Redetermining Disability Among Children Receiving Supplemental Security Income Benefits

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Title: Potential Savings From Redetermining Disability Among Children Receiving Supplemental Security Income Benefits
Author: Pulcini, Christian D.; Kotelchuck, Milton; Kuhlthau, Karen Alice; Nozzolillo, Alixandra A; Perrin, James Marc

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Citation: Pulcini, Christian D., Milton Kotelchuck, Karen A. Kuhlthau, Alixandra A. Nozzolillo, and James M. Perrin. 2012. “Potential Savings From Redetermining Disability Among Children Receiving Supplemental Security Income Benefits.” Academic Pediatrics 12 (6) (November): 489–494. doi:10.1016/j.acap.2012.07.001.
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Abstract: Objective: To compare costs of redetermining disability to direct savings in SSI payments associated with different strategies for implementing Continuing Disability Reviews (CDRs) among children potentially enrolled in SSI from 2012–2021. Methods: We reviewed publicly available reports from the Social Security Administration (SSA) and Government Accountability Office (GAO) to estimate costs and savings. We considered CDRs for children ages 1–17 years, excluding mandated Low-Birth Weight and Age 18 Redeterminations that SSA has routinely carried out. Results: If SSA in 2012 performs the same number of CDRs for children as in 2010 (16,677, 1% of eligibles) at a cessation rate of 15%, the agency would experience net savings of approximately $145 million in benefit payments. If CDR numbers increased to the highest level ever (183,211, 22% of eligibles, in 1999) at the same cessation rate, the agency would save approximately $1.6 billion in benefit payments. Discussion: Increasing the numbers of CDRs for children represents a considerable opportunity for savings. Recognizing the dynamic nature of disability, the agency could reassess persistence of disability systematically. Doing so could free up resources from children who are no longer eligible and help the agency better direct its benefits to recipients with ongoing disability and whose families need support to meet the extra costs associated with raising a child with a major disability.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.acap.2012.07.001
Other Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3501557/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:30207920
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