The Chandra X‐Ray Observatory Resolves the X‐Ray Morphology and Spectra of a Jet in PKS 0637-752

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The Chandra X‐Ray Observatory Resolves the X‐Ray Morphology and Spectra of a Jet in PKS 0637-752

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Title: The Chandra X‐Ray Observatory Resolves the X‐Ray Morphology and Spectra of a Jet in PKS 0637-752
Author: Chartas, G.; Worrall, Diana M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Cresitello‐Dittmar, M.; Cui, W.; Ghosh, K. K.; Harris, D. E.; Hooper, E. J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Kim, Dong-Woo; Lovell, J.; Mathur, S.; Schwartz, Daniel Alan; Tingay, S. J.; Virani, S. N.; Wilkes, Belinda Jane

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Citation: Chartas, G., D. M. Worrall, M. Birkinshaw, M. Cresitello‐Dittmar, W. Cui, K. K. Ghosh, D. E. Harris, et al. 2000. “The Chandra X‐Ray Observatory Resolves the X‐Ray Morphology and Spectra of a Jet in PKS 0637-752.” The Astrophysical Journal 542 (2) (October 20): 655–666. doi:10.1086/317049.
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Abstract: The core-dominated radio-loud quasar PKS 0637-752 (z = 0.654) was the first celestial object observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, offering the early surprise of the detection of a remarkable X-ray jet. Several observations with a variety of detector configurations contribute to a total exposure time with the Chandra ACIS of about 100 ks. A spatial analysis of all the available X-ray data, making use of Chandra's spatial resolving power of about 0farcs4, reveals a jet that extends about 10'' to the west of the nucleus. At least four X-ray knots are resolved along the jet, which contains about 5% of the overall X-ray luminosity of the source. Previous observations of PKS 0637-752 in the radio band had identified a kiloparsec-scale radio jet extending to the west of the quasar. The X-ray and radio jets are similar in shape, intensity distribution, and angular structure out to about 9'', after which the X-ray brightness decreases more rapidly and the radio jet turns abruptly to the north. The X-ray luminosity of the total source is log LX ≈ 45.8 ergs s-1 (2-10 keV) and appears not to have changed since it was observed with ASCA in 1996 November. We present the results of fitting a variety of emission models to the observed spectral distribution, comment on the nonexistence of emission lines recently reported in the ASCA observations of PKS 0637-752, and briefly discuss plausible X-ray emission mechanisms.
Published Version: doi:10.1086/317049
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:30212167
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