Skull base erosion and associated complications in sphenoid sinus fungal balls

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Skull base erosion and associated complications in sphenoid sinus fungal balls

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Title: Skull base erosion and associated complications in sphenoid sinus fungal balls
Author: Meier, Josh C.; Scangas, George A.; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Sadow, Peter; Chambers, Kyle; Dedmon, Matt; Lin, Derrick T.; Holbrook, Eric H.; Metson, Ralph; Gray, Stacey T.

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Citation: Meier, Josh C., George A. Scangas, Aaron K. Remenschneider, Peter Sadow, Kyle Chambers, Matt Dedmon, Derrick T. Lin, Eric H. Holbrook, Ralph Metson, and Stacey T. Gray. 2016. “Skull base erosion and associated complications in sphenoid sinus fungal balls.” Allergy & Rhinology 7 (4): e227-e232. doi:10.2500/ar.2016.7.0182. http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/ar.2016.7.0182.
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Abstract: Background: Sphenoid sinus fungal balls (SSFB) are rare entities that can result in serious orbital and intracranial complications. There are few published reports of complications that result from SSFB. Objective: To review the incidence of skull base erosion and orbital or intracranial complications in patients who present with SSFB. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all the patients with SSFB who were treated at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary from 2006 to 2014. Presenting clinical data, radiology, operative reports, pathology, and postoperative course were reviewed. Results: Forty-three patients with SSFB were identified. Demographic data were compared between patients with (39.5%) and those without (61.5%) skull base erosion. Two patients underwent emergent surgery for acute complications of SSFB (one patient with blindness, one patient who had a seizure). Both patients with acute complications had evidence of skull base erosion, whereas no patients with an intact skull base developed an orbital or intracranial complication (p = 0.15). All the patients were surgically managed via an endoscopic approach. Conclusion: SSFBs are rare but may cause significant skull base erosion and potentially severe orbital and intracranial complications if not treated appropriately. Endoscopic sphenoidotomy is effective in treating SSFB and should be performed emergently in patients who presented with associated complications.
Published Version: doi:10.2500/ar.2016.7.0182
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5244283/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:30370932
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