Partnerships in mental healthcare service delivery in low-resource settings: developing an innovative network in rural Nepal

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Partnerships in mental healthcare service delivery in low-resource settings: developing an innovative network in rural Nepal

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Title: Partnerships in mental healthcare service delivery in low-resource settings: developing an innovative network in rural Nepal
Author: Acharya, Bibhav; Maru, Duncan; Schwarz, Ryan; Citrin, David; Tenpa, Jasmine; Hirachan, Soniya; Basnet, Madhur; Thapa, Poshan; Swar, Sikhar; Halliday, Scott; Kohrt, Brandon; Luitel, Nagendra P.; Hung, Erick; Gauchan, Bikash; Pokharel, Rajeev; Ekstrand, Maria

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Citation: Acharya, B., D. Maru, R. Schwarz, D. Citrin, J. Tenpa, S. Hirachan, M. Basnet, et al. 2017. “Partnerships in mental healthcare service delivery in low-resource settings: developing an innovative network in rural Nepal.” Globalization and Health 13 (1): 2. doi:10.1186/s12992-016-0226-0. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12992-016-0226-0.
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Abstract: Background: Mental illnesses are the largest contributors to the global burden of non-communicable diseases. However, there is extremely limited access to high quality, culturally-sensitive, and contextually-appropriate mental healthcare services. This situation persists despite the availability of interventions with proven efficacy to improve patient outcomes. A partnerships network is necessary for successful program adaptation and implementation. Partnerships network We describe our partnerships network as a case example that addresses challenges in delivering mental healthcare and which can serve as a model for similar settings. Our perspectives are informed from integrating mental healthcare services within a rural public hospital in Nepal. Our approach includes training and supervising generalist health workers by off-site psychiatrists. This is made possible by complementing the strengths and weaknesses of the various groups involved: the public sector, a non-profit organization that provides general healthcare services and one that specializes in mental health, a community advisory board, academic centers in high- and low-income countries, and bicultural professionals from the diaspora community. Conclusions: We propose a partnerships model to assist implementation of promising programs to expand access to mental healthcare in low- resource settings. We describe the success and limitations of our current partners in a mental health program in rural Nepal.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s12992-016-0226-0
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5237195/pdf/
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:30371095
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