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dc.contributor.authorGrøntved, Andersen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoivula, Robert W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohansson, Ingegerden_US
dc.contributor.authorWennberg, Patriken_US
dc.contributor.authorØstergaard, Larsen_US
dc.contributor.authorHallmans, Göranen_US
dc.contributor.authorRenström, Fridaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFranks, Paul W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-18T01:59:11Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.citationGrøntved, Anders, Robert W. Koivula, Ingegerd Johansson, Patrik Wennberg, Lars Østergaard, Göran Hallmans, Frida Renström, and Paul W. Franks. 2016. “Bicycling to Work and Primordial Prevention of Cardiovascular Risk: A Cohort Study Among Swedish Men and Women.” Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease 5 (11): e004413. doi:10.1161/JAHA.116.004413. http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.116.004413.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-9980en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:30371114
dc.description.abstractBackground: Bicycling to work may be a viable approach for achieving physical activity that provides cardiovascular health benefits. In this study we investigated the relationship of bicycling to work with incidence of obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and impaired glucose tolerance across a decade of follow‐up in middle‐aged men and women. Methods and Results: We followed 23 732 Swedish men and women with a mean age of 43.5 years at baseline who attended a health examination twice during a 10‐year period (1990–2011). In multivariable adjusted models we calculated the odds of incident obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, comparing individuals who commuted to work by bicycle with those who used passive modes of transportation. We also examined the relationship of change in commuting mode with incidence of these clinical risk factors. Cycling to work at baseline was associated with lower odds of incident obesity (odds ratio [OR]=0.85, 95% CI 0.73–0.99), hypertension (OR=0.87, 95% CI 0.79–0.95), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=0.85, 95% CI 0.76–0.94), and impaired glucose tolerance (OR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80–0.96) compared with passive travel after adjusting for putative confounding factors. Participants who maintained or began bicycling to work during follow‐up had lower odds of obesity (OR=0.61, 95% CI 0.50–0.73), hypertension (OR=0.89, 95% CI 0.80–0.98), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=0.80, 95% CI 0.70–0.90), and impaired glucose tolerance (OR=0.82, 95% CI 0.74–0.91) compared with participants not cycling to work at both times points or who switched from cycling to other modes of transport during follow‐up. Conclusions: These data suggest that commuting by bicycle to work is an important strategy for primordial prevention of clinical cardiovascular risk factors among middle‐aged men and women.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley and Sons Inc.en
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1161/JAHA.116.004413en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5210355/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectcardiovascular disease preventionen
dc.subjectcyclingen
dc.subjecthypertensionen
dc.subjectimpaired glucose toleranceen
dc.subjectobesityen
dc.subjectphysical exerciseen
dc.subjecttype 2 diabetes mellitusen
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectExerciseen
dc.subjectLifestyleen
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.titleBicycling to Work and Primordial Prevention of Cardiovascular Risk: A Cohort Study Among Swedish Men and Womenen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalJournal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseaseen
dash.depositing.authorFranks, Paul W.en_US
dc.date.available2017-02-18T01:59:11Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/JAHA.116.004413*
dash.contributor.affiliatedFranks, Paul


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