Early Versus Late Onset of Cannabis Use: Differences in Striatal Response to Cannabis Cues

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Early Versus Late Onset of Cannabis Use: Differences in Striatal Response to Cannabis Cues

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Title: Early Versus Late Onset of Cannabis Use: Differences in Striatal Response to Cannabis Cues
Author: Wetherill, Reagan R.; Hager, Nathan; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Mashhoon, Yasmin; Pater, Heather; Childress, Anna Rose; Franklin, Teresa R.

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Citation: Wetherill, Reagan R., Nathan Hager, Kanchana Jagannathan, Yasmin Mashhoon, Heather Pater, Anna Rose Childress, and Teresa R. Franklin. 2017. “Early Versus Late Onset of Cannabis Use: Differences in Striatal Response to Cannabis Cues.” Cannabis and cannabinoid research 1 (1): 229-233. doi:10.1089/can.2016.0026. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/can.2016.0026.
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Abstract: Addiction theories posit that addiction is the result of a progressive transition from voluntary to habitual, compulsive drug use—changes that have been linked, in animals, to a shift from ventral to dorsal striatal control over drug-seeking behavior. Thus, we hypothesized that early-onset (EOs) cannabis users versus late-onset (LOs) cannabis users might exhibit, respectively, greater dorsal versus ventral striatal response to drug cues. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and an event-related blood oxygen level-dependent backward-masking task to evaluate striatal responses to backward-masked cannabis cues (vs. neutral cues) in EOs (<16 years old, n = 15) and LOs (≥16 years old, n = 26) with similar recent cannabis use patterns. Direct comparisons revealed that EOs showed greater response to cannabis cues in the dorsal striatum than LOs (p < 0.01, k > 50 voxels). Within-group analyses revealed that EOs showed greater neural response to cannabis cues in the dorsal striatum, whereas LOs exhibited greater neural response to cannabis cues in the ventral striatum. Although cross-sectional, these findings are consistent with recent addiction theories suggesting a progressive shift from ventral to dorsal striatal control over drug-seeking behavior and highlight the importance of age of onset of cannabis use on the brain and cognition.
Published Version: doi:10.1089/can.2016.0026
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5358095/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32071911
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