Ancestry and demography and descendants of Iron Age nomads of the Eurasian Steppe

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Ancestry and demography and descendants of Iron Age nomads of the Eurasian Steppe

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Title: Ancestry and demography and descendants of Iron Age nomads of the Eurasian Steppe
Author: Unterländer, Martina; Palstra, Friso; Lazaridis, Iosif; Pilipenko, Aleksandr; Hofmanová, Zuzana; Groß, Melanie; Sell, Christian; Blöcher, Jens; Kirsanow, Karola; Rohland, Nadin; Rieger, Benjamin; Kaiser, Elke; Schier, Wolfram; Pozdniakov, Dimitri; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Georges, Myriam; Wilde, Sandra; Powell, Adam; Heyer, Evelyne; Currat, Mathias; Reich, David; Samashev, Zainolla; Parzinger, Hermann; Molodin, Vyacheslav I.; Burger, Joachim

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Unterländer, M., F. Palstra, I. Lazaridis, A. Pilipenko, Z. Hofmanová, M. Groß, C. Sell, et al. 2017. “Ancestry and demography and descendants of Iron Age nomads of the Eurasian Steppe.” Nature Communications 8 (1): 14615. doi:10.1038/ncomms14615. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14615.
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Abstract: During the 1st millennium before the Common Era (BCE), nomadic tribes associated with the Iron Age Scythian culture spread over the Eurasian Steppe, covering a territory of more than 3,500 km in breadth. To understand the demographic processes behind the spread of the Scythian culture, we analysed genomic data from eight individuals and a mitochondrial dataset of 96 individuals originating in eastern and western parts of the Eurasian Steppe. Genomic inference reveals that Scythians in the east and the west of the steppe zone can best be described as a mixture of Yamnaya-related ancestry and an East Asian component. Demographic modelling suggests independent origins for eastern and western groups with ongoing gene-flow between them, plausibly explaining the striking uniformity of their material culture. We also find evidence that significant gene-flow from east to west Eurasia must have occurred early during the Iron Age.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/ncomms14615
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5337992/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32072003
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