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dc.contributor.authorViswanathan, Vijayen_US
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, John P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Byoung W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPlantz, Christopher L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYing, Haoen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Myung J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRaman, Kalyanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMulhern, Frank J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlock, Martin P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCalder, Bobbyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sangen_US
dc.contributor.authorMortensen, Dale T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlood, Anne J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBreiter, Hans C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-06T03:19:20Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.citationViswanathan, V., J. P. Sheppard, B. W. Kim, C. L. Plantz, H. Ying, M. J. Lee, K. Raman, et al. 2017. “A Quantitative Relationship between Signal Detection in Attention and Approach/Avoidance Behavior.” Frontiers in Psychology 8 (1): 122. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00122. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00122.en
dc.identifier.issnen
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32072068
dc.description.abstractThis study examines how the domains of reward and attention, which are often studied as independent processes, in fact interact at a systems level. We operationalize divided attention with a continuous performance task and variables from signal detection theory (SDT), and reward/aversion with a keypress task measuring approach/avoidance in the framework of relative preference theory (RPT). Independent experiments with the same subjects showed a significant association between one SDT and two RPT variables, visualized as a three-dimensional structure. Holding one of these three variables constant, further showed a significant relationship between a loss aversion-like metric from the approach/avoidance task, and the response bias observed during the divided attention task. These results indicate that a more liberal response bias under signal detection (i.e., a higher tolerance for noise, resulting in a greater proportion of false alarms) is associated with higher “loss aversion.” Furthermore, our functional model suggests a mechanism for processing constraints with divided attention and reward/aversion. Together, our results argue for a systematic relationship between divided attention and reward/aversion processing in humans.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.en
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00122en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5318395/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectattentionen
dc.subjectrewarden
dc.subjectrelative preferenceen
dc.subjectsignal detection theoryen
dc.subjectpsychophysicsen
dc.subjectiterative modelingen
dc.subjectneuroeconomicsen
dc.titleA Quantitative Relationship between Signal Detection in Attention and Approach/Avoidance Behavioren
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen
dash.depositing.authorLee, Sangen_US
dc.date.available2017-04-06T03:19:20Z
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00122*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedBlood, Anne
dash.contributor.affiliatedLee, Sang


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