Rats, Communications, and Plague: Toward an Ecological History

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Rats, Communications, and Plague: Toward an Ecological History

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Title: Rats, Communications, and Plague: Toward an Ecological History
Author: McCormick, Michael
Citation: McCormick, Michael. 2003. Rats, communications, and plague: Toward an ecological history. Journal of Interdisciplinary History 34, no. 1: 1-25.
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Abstract: During the last twenty years, archaeozoological research has significantly transformed the picture of the black rat (rattus rattus) in classical antiquity and medieval Europe. These new data, in conjunction with extant texts from these periods, make a great contribution to the understanding of the bubonic plagues of the sixth and the fourteenth centuries, as well as to the history of the communications and economic systems linking the Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic. The study of ancient rats and their colonization extends the temporal and geographical groundwork for a fully historical global ecology.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/002219503322645439
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3208221
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