The Impact of Natural Disaster on Pediatric Surgical Delivery: A Review of Haiti Six Months Before and After the 2010 Earthquake

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The Impact of Natural Disaster on Pediatric Surgical Delivery: A Review of Haiti Six Months Before and After the 2010 Earthquake

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Title: The Impact of Natural Disaster on Pediatric Surgical Delivery: A Review of Haiti Six Months Before and After the 2010 Earthquake
Author: Hughes, Christopher; Nash, Katherine; Alkire, Blake Christian; McClain, Craig David; Hagander, Lars; Smithers, Charles Jason; Raymonville, Maxi; Sullivan, Stephen R.; Riviello, Robert; Rogers, Selwyn O.; Meara, John Gerard

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Citation: Hughes, Christopher D., Katherine A. Nash, Blake C. Alkire, Craig D. McClain, Lars E. Hagander, C. Jason Smithers, Maxi Raymonville, et al. 2012. “The Impact of Natural Disaster on Pediatric Surgical Delivery: A Review of Haiti Six Months Before and After the 2010 Earthquake.” Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 23 (2): 523–533. doi:10.1353/hpu.2012.0067.
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Abstract: Little is known about pediatric surgical disease in resource-poor countries. This study documents the surgical care of children in central Haiti and demonstrates the influence of the 2010 earthquake on pediatric surgical delivery. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of operations performed at Partners in Health/Zanmi Lasante hospitals in central Haiti. Results. Of 2,057 operations performed prior to the earthquake, 423 were pediatric (20.6%). Congenital anomalies were the most common operative indication (159/423 opera- tions; 33.5%). Pediatric surgical volume increased signi cantly a er the earthquake, with524 Pediatric surgical care in Haiti 670 operations performed (23.0% post-earthquake v. 20.6% pre-earthquake, p5.03). Trauma and burns became the most common surgical diagnoses a er the disaster, and operations for non-traumatic conditions decreased signi cantly (p,.01). Conclusion. Congenital anomalies represent a signi cant proportion of baseline surgical need in Haiti. A natural disaster can change the nature of pediatric surgical practice by signi cantly increasing demand for operative trauma care for months afterward.
Published Version: doi:doi.org/10.1353/hpu.2012.0067
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32202877
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