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dc.contributor.authorHughes, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorNash, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorAlkire, Blake Christian
dc.contributor.authorMcClain, Craig David
dc.contributor.authorHagander, Lars
dc.contributor.authorSmithers, Charles Jason
dc.contributor.authorRaymonville, Maxi
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Stephen R.
dc.contributor.authorRiviello, Robert
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Selwyn O.
dc.contributor.authorMeara, John Gerard
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-19T16:36:17Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2017-04-13T14:48:58-0400
dc.identifier.citationHughes, Christopher D., Katherine A. Nash, Blake C. Alkire, Craig D. McClain, Lars E. Hagander, C. Jason Smithers, Maxi Raymonville, et al. 2012. “The Impact of Natural Disaster on Pediatric Surgical Delivery: A Review of Haiti Six Months Before and After the 2010 Earthquake.” Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 23 (2): 523–533. doi:10.1353/hpu.2012.0067.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1548-6869en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32202877
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about pediatric surgical disease in resource-poor countries. This study documents the surgical care of children in central Haiti and demonstrates the influence of the 2010 earthquake on pediatric surgical delivery. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of operations performed at Partners in Health/Zanmi Lasante hospitals in central Haiti. Results. Of 2,057 operations performed prior to the earthquake, 423 were pediatric (20.6%). Congenital anomalies were the most common operative indication (159/423 opera- tions; 33.5%). Pediatric surgical volume increased signi cantly a er the earthquake, with524 Pediatric surgical care in Haiti 670 operations performed (23.0% post-earthquake v. 20.6% pre-earthquake, p5.03). Trauma and burns became the most common surgical diagnoses a er the disaster, and operations for non-traumatic conditions decreased signi cantly (p,.01). Conclusion. Congenital anomalies represent a signi cant proportion of baseline surgical need in Haiti. A natural disaster can change the nature of pediatric surgical practice by signi cantly increasing demand for operative trauma care for months afterward.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:doi.org/10.1353/hpu.2012.0067en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectPediatricsen_US
dc.subjectsurgeryen_US
dc.subjectresource-poor settingsen_US
dc.subjectburden of surgical diseaseen_US
dc.subjectnatural disasteren_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Natural Disaster on Pediatric Surgical Delivery: A Review of Haiti Six Months Before and After the 2010 Earthquakeen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2017-04-13T18:48:53Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserveden_US
dash.depositing.authorMeara, John Gerard
dc.date.available2010
dc.date.available2017-04-19T16:36:17Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/hpu.2012.0067*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedNash, Katherine
dash.contributor.affiliatedHughes, Christopher
dash.contributor.affiliatedSmithers, Charles
dash.contributor.affiliatedRaymonville, Maxi
dash.contributor.affiliatedHagander, Lars
dash.contributor.affiliatedAlkire, Blake
dash.contributor.affiliatedMcClain, Craig
dash.contributor.affiliatedRiviello, Robert
dash.contributor.affiliatedMeara, John


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