Engaging children in the development of obesity interventions: Exploring outcomes that matter most among obesity positive outliers

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Engaging children in the development of obesity interventions: Exploring outcomes that matter most among obesity positive outliers

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Title: Engaging children in the development of obesity interventions: Exploring outcomes that matter most among obesity positive outliers
Author: Sharifi, Mona; Marshall, Gareth; Goldman, Roberta E.; Cunningham, Courtney; Marshall, Richard E.; Taveras, Elsie Mireya

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Sharifi, Mona, Gareth Marshall, Roberta E. Goldman, Courtney Cunningham, Richard Marshall, and Elsie M. Taveras. 2015. “Engaging Children in the Development of Obesity Interventions: Exploring Outcomes That Matter Most Among Obesity Positive Outliers.” Patient Education and Counseling 98 (11) (November): 1393–1401. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2015.06.007.
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Abstract: Objective

To explore outcomes and measures of success that matter most to 'positive outlier' children who improved their body mass index (BMI) despite living in obesogenic neighborhoods.

Methods

We collected residential address and longitudinal height/weight data from electronic health records of 22,657 children ages 6–12 years in Massachusetts. We defined obesity “hotspots” as zip codes where >15% of children had a BMI ≥95th percentile. Using linear mixed effects models, we generated a BMI z-score slope for each child with a history of obesity. We recruited 10–12 year-olds with negative slopes living in hotspots for focus groups. We analyzed group transcripts and discussed emerging themes in iterative meetings using an immersion/crystallization approach.

Results

We reached thematic saturation after 4 focus groups with 21 children. Children identified bullying and negative peer comparisons related to physical appearance, clothing size, and athletic ability as motivating them to achieve a healthier weight, and they measured success as improvement in these domains. Positive relationships with friends and family facilitated both behavior change initiation and maintenance.

Conclusions

The perspectives of positive outlier children can provide insight into children’s motivations leading to successful obesity management. Practice implications: Child/family engagement should guide the development of patient-centered obesity interventions.
Published Version: 10.1016/j.pec.2015.06.007
Other Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4609258/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32293357
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