The Why, what, and How of the New FACT standards for immune effector cells

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The Why, what, and How of the New FACT standards for immune effector cells

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Title: The Why, what, and How of the New FACT standards for immune effector cells
Author: Maus, Marcela V.; Nikiforow, Sarah

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Citation: Maus, Marcela V., and Sarah Nikiforow. 2017. “The Why, what, and How of the New FACT standards for immune effector cells.” Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer 5 (1): 36. doi:10.1186/s40425-017-0239-0. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40425-017-0239-0.
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Abstract: Novel cellular therapies outside of traditional hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) therapy are currently under evaluation in clinical trials across the United States and around the world. Several cellular products, e.g., CD19-directed Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells, are poised for FDA approval and thus increased use at a wider range of academic centers within the next year, with the likelihood of dissemination to standard oncology practice once safety is confirmed. However, these therapies entail some unique challenges in terms of logistics of delivery and toxicity management. Building on experiences and Standards established for HPC programs, the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT) has established new Standards specific to the use of Immune Effector Cells (IEC), including gene-modified T cells and natural (NK) cells. These Standards specify the clinical and quality infrastructure to facilitate safe administration of immune effector cells and formalize subsequent monitoring and reporting of patient outcomes to enable continual process improvement. Below we detail why these standards came into being, what they entail, and how a clinical team might access educational materials and implement these Standards. We propose that these Standards will be increasingly useful and relied up on as institutions and clinical service lines seek access to these treatment for their patients. FACT will begin accrediting programs that meet these new Standards for clinical administration of Immune Effector Cells in 2017.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s40425-017-0239-0
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5394615/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32630453
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