Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWu, Lunpoen_US
dc.contributor.authorFu, Jianfeien_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, Lien_US
dc.contributor.authorPan, Jieen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, Sanchuanen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Jingen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, Daniel C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Liangjingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-01T19:26:46Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.citationWu, Lunpo, Jianfei Fu, Li Wan, Jie Pan, Sanchuan Lai, Jing Zhong, Daniel C. Chung, and Liangjing Wang. 2017. “Survival outcomes and surgical intervention of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors: a population based retrospective study.” Oncotarget 8 (3): 4935-4947. doi:10.18632/oncotarget.13632. http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.13632.en
dc.identifier.issnen
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32630457
dc.description.abstractBackground: Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SiNETs) without distant metastasis typically behave in an indolent manner, but there can be heterogeneity. We aimed to define the survival outcomes and impacts of surgical intervention. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted by using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Clinicopathologic features were analyzed in 4407 patients between 2000 and 2012. The cancer specific survival (CSS) was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariable Cox regression models with hazard ratios (HRs) were constructed to analyze survival outcomes and risk factors. Results: The adjusted incidence of early SiNETs is 1.3/100,000. Tumors are most commonly located in the ileum and are small (≤ 2 cm). The 5-year and 10-year CSS rates were 95.0% and 88.5%, respectively. Age > 50 years, large tumor size (> 2cm), poor differentiation, advanced T classification, and absence of surgical treatment were independent predictors of poor survival. Stratified analysis indicated that surgery significantly improved survival in patients that were white (HR, 0.45), > 50 years old (HR, 0.61), had duodenal tumors (HR, 0.43), large tumors (> 2cm) (HR, 0.32), advanced T classification (T3: HR, 0.29; T4: HR, 0.18) or well differentiation (HR, 0.55). There was no significant survival difference between local resection and radical resection (P =0.884). Conclusions: Early SiNETs have a favorable prognosis. Surgical resection may improve outcomes, particularly in older patients and those with large tumors. More aggressive resections couldn't improve outcomes.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherImpact Journals LLCen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.18632/oncotarget.13632en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5354882/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectsmall intestineen
dc.subjectneuroendocrine tumorsen
dc.subjectprognostic factorsen
dc.subjectsurgical managementen
dc.subjectSEERen
dc.titleSurvival outcomes and surgical intervention of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors: a population based retrospective studyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalOncotargeten
dash.depositing.authorChung, Daniel C.en_US
dc.date.available2017-05-01T19:26:46Z
dc.identifier.doi10.18632/oncotarget.13632*
dash.contributor.affiliatedChung, Daniel


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record