Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: a Case Report and Literature Review

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Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: a Case Report and Literature Review

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Title: Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: a Case Report and Literature Review
Author: Qavi, Ahmed H; Imran, Tasnim F; Hasan, Zachariah; Ilyas, Fariha; Ghani, Usman; Assad, Salman; Hasan, Shabih

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Citation: Qavi, Ahmed H, Tasnim F Imran, Zachariah Hasan, Fariha Ilyas, Usman Ghani, Salman Assad, and Shabih Hasan. 2017. “Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: a Case Report and Literature Review.” Cureus 9 (3): e1095. doi:10.7759/cureus.1095. http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.1095.
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Abstract: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare, degenerative, invariably fatal brain disorder. CJD usually appears in later life and runs a rapid course. Typically, the onset of symptoms occurs about age 60 and about 90% of individuals die within one year. We report a case of 67-year-old male presented with progressive aphasia, confusion, dysphagia and inability to carry out activities of daily life (ADLs) over a period of three to four weeks. The patient had past medical history of chronic atrial fibrillation and hypertension. Prior to admission, the patient was treated for ischemic stroke of left basal ganglia but continued to have worsening encephalopathy. The spinal tap revealed a 14-3-3 protein level of thirteen times the upper limit of normal; electroencephalogram (EEG) showed a diffuse slowing of the background and periodic sharp waves with greater involvement of the left hemisphere. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of admission showed extensive signal abnormality in the basal ganglia bilaterally and in the cerebral cortex bilaterally, particularly over the left cerebral hemisphere. The persistence of the MRI findings over several weeks was concerning for spongiform encephalopathy. The probable diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was made based on these imaging findings taken together with the patient’s clinical signs and symptoms of a rapidly progressive encephalopathy. The patient was able to have some quality time with his family as the diagnosis was made earlier than perhaps otherwise and expired peacefully after comfort care measures were chosen. Serial MRI may serve as a clue to the early diagnosis of CJD and potentially provide a better quality of life for the patients.
Published Version: doi:10.7759/cureus.1095
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5392034/pdf/
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32630729
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